Peek of the Week – Christmas edition [updated]

Yes its already that time again… here is our round up of the most viewed, talked about and expensive Christmas commercials starting with The Bear and the Hare, the £7 million John Lewis Christmas TV commercial;

Its arrival heralds the start of the festivities, according to economists, although the rival M&S campaign, unveiled this week, began the annual drive to make us stop budgeting and start indulging. M&S’s poster girl, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, in lingerie naturally, will be vying against a cartoon bear, the star of the John Lewis campaign. It’s beauty versus the beast.

Taking a different approach is Tesco that goes down the nostalgic route;

Morrison is playing it safe with celebrity endorsement

ASDA doesn’t give up on the price war, even during Christmas;

A very cute and massive unwrap from Cadbury

One of my favourite LEGO;

But Sainsbury probably created the most buzz this year with Christmas in a day. Last year they asked people to send in their personal video and so Christmas in a Day features heart-warming home footage of celebrations. Directed by Oscar-winning Life In A Day director Kevin Macdonald, His award-winning 2011 Youtube film featured 80,000 crowd-sourced clips. The ’Christmas in a Day’ 50-minute film, which took 14 months to make, documents the different experiences of a range of UK families to capture the diversity of celebrations across the country.

33% of tablet owners watch 1 Hour Of Video Content Per Day

In just a few short years the tablet has become a hugely popular second screen of choice for 33% of American adults, and while it may not be an essential item, its affordability means that it is within reach of an increasing number of users. New research from YuMe shows how we use our tablets and it’s no surprise to see that a third of of us devote an hour a day to them, with the minimum of distraction. As for video consumption, 100% of those tablet users surveyed confirmed that they watch videos at home, 66% watch videos on holiday, 22% watch videos while commuting or at work and 13% will watch video content while out drinking or dining.

33% of tablet owning adults will watch video for up to 1 hour a day on weekdays while 24% will watch up to two hours of content on the weekends. 8% of adults will watch around 4 hours of video content at the weekends, presumably due to less distractions.

Tablet use also lead to better recall of video ads, according to the report, with 57% of those asked able to recall a video ad without prompting. That compares favourably against the smartphone (49%) and the TV (45%). Advertisers that created mobile specific ad content were also perceived as being ‘cooler’.

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Over the past four years, the percent of American adult internet users who upload or post videos online has doubled from 14% in 2009 to 31% today. That includes 18% of adult internet users who post videos they have created or recorded themselves—many of whom hope their creations go viral. The share of online adults who watch or download videos has also grown from 69% of internet users in 2009 to 78% today, and mobile phones have become a key part of the video viewing and creating experience.

The increasing popularity of social networking sites and the proliferation of cell phones have helped spur the growing online video culture
The growing popularity of posting and watching online videos is a natural byproduct of the increasing percent of adults who use social network sites such as Facebook, as well as the proliferation of cell phones which make it relatively easy to watch, record, and post videos online. Fully 72% of online adults now use social networking sites, which provide a venue for video sharing and watching. The current survey shows that:

  • 71% of adults who post videos online do so on social networking sites.
  • 58% of adults who watch online videos do so on social networking sites.

Similarly, as the percent of American adults who own a cell phone has reached 91%4 , it is not  uncommon for adults to use these devices to participate in the online video culture. Among adult cell phone owners:

  • 41% use their phones to watch video.
  •  40% use their phones to record video.
  • 20% use their phones to post videos online.

More recently, apps have emerged which bring the convenience of cell phones together with the
popularity of online video. In the current survey:

  • 23% of adults who post videos online do so using a mobile app such as Vine.
  • 17% of adults who watch videos online do so using a mobile app

Think social media will drive viewers to TV programs? Think again

Content owners increasingly are turning to social media in hopes of being able to deepen relationships with regular viewers, and, perhaps more importantly, to attract new or occasional viewers to specific programming. But a new study suggests that while social media can help enhance existing relationships with viewers, if it’s used to often, it efficacy decreases. And, in the case of non- or infrequent  viewers, social media may have little–if any impact–on drawing them into the fold. The study, from the Council for Research Excellence, found that word-of-mouth is far more likely—five to 10 times more so–to attract new or infrequent viewers to a TV show than Facebook, Twitter, or other social apps.

“While our ‘Talking Social TV’ study found social media incrementally influential in drawing viewers to new shows as opposed to existing shows,” said Beth Rockwood, senior vice president, market resources, of Discovery Communications, who chairs the CRE’s Social Media Committee, “these latest findings suggest social media may have a stronger role in building relationships with a show for existing viewers than in drawing newer viewers to that show. If programmers already have a regular viewer watching their show, they can engage them further.”

The study helped the CRE identify two distinct types of viewers—the “repeaters” and the “infrequents,” Rockwood said. It also helped it “understand the relative roles of demographics and program genre in determining the impact of social media, and to observe the effects of different forms of communication on viewers.”

For instance, the study found that social media holds more sway with repeaters who are over 55 and white, and for infrequent viewers who are Hispanic, African American and male. It is also interesting to see the type of content that has most impact.

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CRE said a second study into the relationship of social media and TV viewing, encompassing a lengthier survey of respondents using mobile apps as diaries, is expected to launch later this year.

The academic review of the study was conducted by a team including The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, the Simon School of Business at the University of Rochester, and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Some other findings include:

  • For repeaters, the first encounters with offline word-of-mouth, or a one-to-one electronic communication such as an email or text, or a social-media communication, are related to higher viewing — while subsequent communications can have diminishing returns.
  • For repeaters, those receiving an initial social media message were found more likely to watch a show by one percentage point, with diminishing returns after each additional exposure to a social media message.
  • For infrequent viewers, social media and show promos were found to be less related to high viewing than offline word-of-mouth, which peaks at a four-percentage-point increase in the likelihood of sampling the show.  More than five social media exposures are needed to obtain the same one-percentage-point lift as one offline word-of-mouth exposure for these infrequent viewers. This suggests social media plays a role in encouraging sampling, but a smaller one;
  • Social media plays a stronger role for genres such as reality (a nearly four-percentage-point increase in likelihood of watching), sports (more than a two-percentage-point increase) and talk shows (approximately a one-percentage-point increase).

The CRE is an independent research group funded by Nielsen.

Click here for more details on the research.

Hated GoDaddy Super Bowl Ads Increase Hosting Sales 45 Percent

The two Super Bowl ads that GoDaddy ran this year were roundly chastised for being stupid, immature, silly and just plain dumb. Well the last laugh is on the haters because those two ads delivered GoDaddy its biggest sales day in the history of the company.

According to the company, domain registration were up 40 percent, hosting sales were up 45 percent and mobile customer jumped 35 percent.

Take that, haters!

One of GoDaddy’s ads, Perfect Match, featured supermodel Bar Refaeli sucking face with a geek. Another, YourBigIdea, highlighted would be entrepreneurs mocking the need to immediately register a domain.

The reason these ads worked is simple. They were perfectly matched to the target audience. Registering a domain and dealing with a hosting company rests, for the most part, squarely with low level IT professionals who are mostly male. Silly bathroom humor plays quite well with this audience. It’s really that simple.

There are many companies with whom one can register a domain. When the boss asks the geek to register several new domains, which registrar do you think the geek will select? The one he remembers most. And these ads are memorable. Stupid, maybe, but memorable.

And that’s all that really matter.