Pre-roll Ads Most Tolerable Video Ad Format [Report]

Yahoo! surveyed 1,775 consumers in the 16-44 age range who are regular online video viewers, several time a week at the least. Some of the results seem counter-intuitive to what many other reports have found. I guess it depends on who you survey, what platform you survey form and when you survey.

Paying for video seems to be not all that popular with the Yahoo! survey respondents. Just 35% said they would make micro payments for video while just 25% would pay monthly subscription fees for video. But the question is, are they talking about things like news video clips you find on Yahoo!? I mean, presumably, the audience they surveyed was theirs and not say, Netflix users.

Now, 35% of the U.S. online video viewing population is about 66 million people so that’s not all that bad. 25% is 47.25 million and that would be a fairly large SVOD subscriber base.

The research also showed that the video viewers are pretty ad savvy. Over half (57%) expect online advertising to be “more interactive.” More interactive than what immediately sprang to my mind. Than TV or print? Surely. Than other forms of digital advertising? Well, who knows, because I can’t find the exact wording of the question.

Privacy seems to be less of an issue to these surveyed consumers;

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Nearly half of the respondents expect online advertising to be relevant to them and 55% expect to have some choice in the ads that are shown to them. So overall, about half of the respondents are ad savvy where they have some passing familiarity with interactivity, engagement, ad relevance and targeting and ad choice, presumably in pre-roll ads.

The quality expectation for online video content has come close to that from TV.

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This question seems a bit leading to me. Were they asking about appealing or disruptive or a combination of both? Take a look at this slide from a Yahoo! presentation of the results (the typo is theirs I assure you). It’s entirely possible that the “How acceptabile [sic] are each of these ads ?” was the exact question I suppose.

yahoo video ad format acceptance

Here’s that part where I said tolerable because just 22% said that pre-rolls are more acceptable, apparently in regards to the others. Second was interactive ads which had an 18% approval rating, even though in the same slide show 57% said they expect the ads to be more interactive. Sponsorships also got 18% of the vote. Tied at 15% were banner and wrapped banners and mid-rolls were least acceptable in the reported results.

For video player ads there’s a 10% difference in acceptance of mid-roll and pre-roll. I hate pre-rolls personally, especially when the ad is paired with a piece of content that is less than 200% of the ad length. In terms of relevant targeting, 42% said they would be happy to share shopping information to get more relevant ads, another 42% said they might consider it and 16% said No .

Finally a few key take aways for advertisers;

  • Take into account daypart, device type, and demeanor

  • •Don’t get in the way of what the user wants to do

  • •Use data wisely and respectfully when targeting

  • •Contribute to the value exchange and reciprocity

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YouTube advertising revenue surges 50% to $5.6bn

Advertisers will spend a projected $5.6bn on YouTube in 2013, an increase of more than 50 per cent on the previous year, according to a report that underlines a shift away from traditional television ads. The sharp rise, which follows an explosion of viewing on mobile devices, comes as advertisers strive to reach younger consumers who have drifted away from television. Television’s share of advertising budgets has peaked after 30 years of growth and online video is now competing for ad spending. YouTube does not keep all of the advertising revenue that flows through its site, paying much of it to partners and “content creators”. The report, by media research firm eMarketer, predicts that YouTube’s net revenues will be $1.96bn once those partners have been paid, giving it 1.7 per cent of all global digital advertising spending. This is a larger market share than sites such as Twitter, AOL and Pandora, eMarketer said.

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“Video ad revenues are expected to increase significantly in coming years for YouTube’s US operations, particularly as mobile video viewership grows,” said the report. Television remains the biggest global recipient of ad spending globally: in the US advertisers are expected to spend an estimated $66.5bn in 2013. But eMarketer is projecting only modest increases over the next three years. “There’s ongoing fragmentation in viewing,” said Dan Cryan, senior director of digital media with IHS, a media research firm. “TV viewing is more or less flat but total video viewing is going up and that’s being driven by things like YouTube and Netflix.”

YouTube, acquired by Google in 2006 for $1.65bn, has more than 1bn viewers every month and attracts about a fifth of all advertising spending on US online video. It has faced competition from rival sites such as Hulu, which expects to generate $1bn in advertising revenues in 2013, but it has maintained its lead. Hulu, owned by Walt Disney, 21st century Fox and NBCUniversal, has twice explored a sale only to call off proposed deals at the last minute.

Heightened advertiser interest in YouTube comes as a new generation of online video production studios have sprung up to cater for a younger generation that watches most of its television programming online.

Investors are clamouring to get a foothold in these companies: Maker Studios, one of the biggest online video networks, recently brought in investors to join a shareholder list that includes Time Warner, Elisabeth Murdoch and Robert Downey Jr, the film star.

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UK Broadcaster 4oD Rolls Out Personalized Video Ads

Vauxhall has become the first advertiser to adopt Channel 4′s new digital ad product Adapt. The UK arm of General Motors will promote its new city car Adam.

The new format enables advertisers to serve an alternative bespoke creative to different viewers registered with Channel4.com based upon their age and gender.

The broadcaster already holds a database of 8.5 million and reaches one in three of the UK’s 16-24 year olds.

Viewers will be served either a male or female version of the ad’s interactive features based on their registration data. The female creative contains a personality quiz feature and also a competition link. The male creative consists of a car colour palette, allowing users to visualise the car in a range of different colours, as well as video elements.

David Amodio, Digital and Creative, Channel 4 said: “This is great example of Channel 4 bringing together our viewer data strategy alongside our innovative suite of 40D ad formats to offer advertisers the chance to target the right audiences with impactful and engaging creative.”

Matthew Eagle, Carat, said: “Channel 4 are leading the way in ad innovation across the VOD platform, with highly engaging advertising formats. The Adapt targeting format will enable clients to move into a space with data driven targeting at the heart, allowing us to continue our mission to drive real business value for our clients that use it.”

Eight digital ad products are currently running on 4oD including Ad Pause, Ad Extend, Ad Link, Ad Mix and Ad Bloom.

Catch up service 4oD is currently available online at Channel4.com as well as YouView, Virgin Media, BT Vision, Sky, Freesat Free Time, Samsung Connected TV, YouTube, iOS and Android mobiles and tablets, PS3 and XBox.Channel-4-4oD-606x293

Have A Strategy for Online Video: Video Marketing Tips

It is quite easy to go through the resources available online on how to create a perfect video for driving links back to your website. It will just take half a day to know the various technical aspects of video creation namely hosting, embedding, acquiring snippets and many others.  But, there is still something missing in this strategy.  First, I would like to throw some light on how popular the concept of video marketing has become of late:

Some Trivial Facts About Online Videos:

These trivial facts about video marketing confirm the belief that video is here to stay for a long, long time.

Now, back to the main point where I mentioned that there is something missing in the video marketing strategy. Nowadays, in the results-oriented scenario, it has become very difficult to clearly define the goals and work towards attaining the same. You get a project, you do some research, get some resources and…snap!  Your video has been created. However, the one thing missing here is…

A Well Planned Video Marketing Strategy:

It is ineluctable to understand the importance of planning in your video marketing strategy. The consequences of a video without a proper planned strategy lead to failure, or some weird situation where the video goes viral without any direction. From the scratch to its launch, a video has to be guided in a well-planned manner so as to get the optimum results. A well planned strategy would include:

  • Understanding Business Goals
  • Define the targeted audience
  • Define the promotional strategy
  • Define the audience demographic
  • Create video which matches the business goals

Let us now understand what a video strives to achieve for you which could be termed as the goal of the video creation process:

  • Build your Brand: Video is a wonderful way to improve your brand reputation. The fact that it depicts the various aspects of the business and its activities through visuals makes it well-suited for marketing.
  • Conversions: Again, video serves the purpose of improving the conversion rate if it has been created keeping in mind the needs of the target audience.
  • Snippets: These could prove to be a valuable asset for your SEO goals, driving traffic to the specific pages where you want to drive it. The CTR would be higher than organic results. You could self-host your videos and submit a video sitemap in order to get rich snippets.

A completely understandable Video SEO Strategy should incorporate the above mentioned goals. You should plan to create the video to attain each of these goals. There will be some obstructions where various questions will arise, but proper planning will help you in designing a perfect strategy.

Here’s why people are more inclined towards video than any other online content:

  • Human touch: People can relate to the videos if they hear a human voice giving out the information on them. It also makes your video content more appealing.
  • Motion: Rather than putting their eyes in motion to read a lengthy article, humans tend to see the visuals in motion and pay attention to the same subject for longer.
  • Information: Nowadays, people are more dependent on the Internet to derive all the required information. Thus, it becomes easy for us to encapsulate all the information into a single video and present it to the audience.

Video is the best content marketing tool that I have witnessed. Try to incorporate a video marketing strategy in your online marketing campaign. It is not only about getting your name online, in fact, it helps you in building relationships and earn trust. It makes your message loud and clear in the most efficient manner. If you are looking for more advice about video marketing contact erwin@reeldealhd.com

100 Hours of Video Uploaded Every Minute to YouTube and How to Stand Out of The Crowd

It’s been a year since it was 72 hours a minute on YouTube but now the video destination site is looking at 100 hours a minute.  To put it into perspective that’s 4 days of content uploaded in a minute!

But what does that mean for you, the video uploader?  It means you’re going to have to try harder to get noticed.  It means following the YouTube Creator Playbook and making your videos stand out from the rest.  While the stats from YouTube about their volume is great news for them and is fun to read about for sheer astonishment, it means you have to step up your game.  Creating video that succeeds is still more than a simple creative endeavor.

But how do you stand out of between billions of videos?

Video content is the freshest way to gain the best kind of exposure for your business, and engaging in video content marketing is not quite as scary as it seems. There are just a few steps you need to take and a few tips to keep in mind to get the most out of video content marketing for your business.

The main point of creating a video to market your business is to get that video shared across social media platforms. That’s just about all you’re after. For this reason, your main objective should be to create a highly compelling video that holds viewers’ attention and makes them think they’re viewing something more meaningful, entertaining or interesting than an advertisement. That being said, let’s make this clear now: DO NOT, by any means, make your video content resemble an ad. Doing so will crush its potential to be shared socially. Unless, of course, you can top the genius of Kmart’s “ship my pants” commercial (unlikely).

There are a few simple qualities the public looks for in a video in order to compel them to engage in social sharing, keeping one or more of these qualities in mind will increase your video’s chances of being shared at a higher rate:

  • Funny (much like “ship my pants”)

  • Adorable (think kittens, bunnies, puppies, babies)

  • Sexy (sex sells: resorting to half-naked men or women might be cheap–but it works)

  • Emotional (a heartfelt story or tear-jerking moment)

  • Narrative (people love a good story. Telling one in a short video can be really effective)

  • Random (randomness is endearing, and these days people can’t get enough of it)

  • Inciting (shocking viewers will get you the attention you’re after. Think controversial)

  • Uplifting (people are always looking for inspiration, and once they get it they’re likely to pass it along)

Alright, so now that you know the elements the public wants to see in an online video, you’ve got to figure out how to produce a video of your own. If you’re just starting out, aim to produce a short video that strongly makes use of one or more of the social sharing characteristics mentioned above.

Have a Plan

First, you need a plan: develop your story, and have a beginning, middle and end to your video. Take a professional approach–or your video will not get very far–create a story board, engage in preproduction, and HIRE PROFESSIONALS!

For a quality video, you need a quality team of professionals. Do your research and hire a great film crew or animation team. If your video is going to have a spokesperson or voiceover, get a professional with an engaging demeanor or a voice that demands attention. Also, make sure the final product has been edited by a team of experts for a clean, professional approach.

Don’t forget about music! Don’t use cheap sample audio clips, they won’t get you much respect and they’ll make your video seem low-grade. Get some original music created by an expert so your video really stands out in its own right.

Distribute Well

Once you’ve produced a high-quality video, you need to pick the right outlets for distribution. Of course you must make use of all the social media outlets possible, especially Facebook, Twitter, and at least one or two blogs. Also, make sure to put your own video on your business website, that’s a given!

Next, you need to look into YouTube (and you’ll probably need to do that before you can post a link to Twitter). YouTube is great because it’s free, and it gives your video the most chance of going viral because everyone uses it.

The only bad thing about YouTube is it’s sometimes looked down on because it’s not professional or business related. So now you’ve got to find a well-respected business or industry-centered site that will showcase your video to executives and people in your field. There are many options out there and you’ve got to pick what’s best for your specific content.

Boost Views

Just like your business website, you need to put a little SEO work into your video to encourage viewing. This means you should:

  • Tag the video with keywords

  • Incorporate metadata with a good description

  • Pick appropriate thumbnails

  • Build links across the Internet that direct back to your video

  • Use a video sitemap

You’ve got to maximize your video hits and SEO is really the best way to do this. Just make sure not to overdo it or try to be sneaky in any way. Don’t overuse keywords, and stay true to your content.

Fortify Your Hard Work

Finally, keep in mind a purpose and a timely occasion for your video to really underpin its importance. Your video content can be quirky and random, but the video’s release should have a point to make: Plan to launch your video leading up to the unveiling of a new product or service to create industry buzz. Perhaps include a press release with your video’s launch or a transcript of the video to send to executives in your industry.

Also, don’t take the one-and-done approach. Aim to produce a video every month or every couple of months depending on your business and budget. The more videos you have, the more you can improve on your strategy and the more attention you’ll gain for your company.

If you need help to create video content, setting up a youtube channel for your business and create engagement get in touch. View our portfolio of bespoke video production.

The Future of Advertising, According To Google

If you want to know where Google‘s going next in advertising–which is a large chunk of where a lot of online advertising overall is going–you need to askSusan Wojcicki, the search giant’s senior vice president of advertising.

Wojcicki drives Google’s accelerating moves well beyond its search ad roots to display, video, and mobile ads. In the past year or so, Google has pushed hardto expand display revenues with a series of acquisitions in ad technology. At the same time, Google faces substantial challenges from Facebook and others pioneering new kinds of ads in the era of social and mobile.

At the ad:tech conference in San Francisco,Wojcicki talked about her “five ideas for the future of advertising.” Not surprisingly, those ideas are somewhat self-serving for Google, which just happens to have answers for most of the challenges she raises. But they also provide clues to where Google will try to push the ad industry as more media goes digital.

In the brief Q&A after her keynote, she was joined by Neal Mohan, Google’s VP of display advertising, who is well worth hearing in his own right. Here are the highlights of what they had to say:

Advertising is the lifeblood of the Internet, she says. But it’s undergoing tremendous change. We need to move as fast as the users. So I spend a lot of time at Google thinking about the future of advertising and how we’re going to reinvent it. The first thing we do is think about users and where they’re going and how are they changing their behaviors.

Imagine this woman in 2020, only seven years away. She’s going to wake up and read her news on a screen, listen to her music, watch TV on demand, use a mobile assistant when she’s on the go, etc. Her life is going to be all digital. So a lot of the ad dollars need to move online.

Wojcicki see five core ideas shaping the future of digital advertising:

1) Choice: Ad views will be voluntary.

We want to move to a model where the user is choosing to view an ad, she says. We’re paid on a cost-per-click basis where the user chooses to click on the ad. It’s up to the ad system and the publisher to show the right ad at the right time.

TrueView ads on YouTube are the same way. About 70% of ads on YouTube are now TrueView. We’ve seen a reduction of 40% in dropoff of ad viewing. One ad on YouTube got 33 million views, an ad by Pepsi featuring race car driver Jeff Gordon, pretending he’s going undercover to buy a car. It got all those views even though it was four minutes long. (Check it out above.)

Another ad format is engagement ads, which show in standard ad formats, but when users hover their mouse over it, catalogs, videos, and other features come up.

2) Control: Users will participate in the ecosystem if we provide enough value and control.

In order to serve things that are relevant to me, you (ad folks) need to know something about me, she says. It’s really important that the ads are relevant and useful. We know this works.

We’ve seen a 30 times increase in programmatic buying of display ads since 2010. But one thing has been missing. That is having users have the opportunity to say this is what I’m interested in. We have an ad preference page where we list the ad preferences of each user. When we offer this opportunity, most people take it. But we need to do this at scale. How can advertisers connect to users at scale?

3) Charm: Ads will be more interactive and beautiful–at scale.

Scale is the important word here. One format we’ve been working on is engagement ads, which give you an opportunity to be more creative. Samsung livestreamed their 90-minute event of the Galaxy S4 launch via a lot of channels, including ads. Click on that ad, and you got a livestream over the existing page. It was one of the most popular concurrent, livestreamed events we’ve seen, right up their with William and Kate’s wedding.

4) Connected: Ads will help people live their lives on the go.

Users have multiple devices, their lives are fragmented across many devices. And the devices are blurring into each other. That’s why we announced Enhanced Campaigns, she says, calling it the biggest change in Google’s AdWords structure in years. The main thrust of the changes, she says: You should be able to target not devices but people. We should be able to get ads that are relevant to where we are and what we’re doing right now.

5) Calibration: All ads will be measured. Clicks will be only one type of measurement.

We need the right type of measurement for branding too, Wojcicki says. So if you’re a brand advertiser, you’re thinking about reach and impact. For reach, she says, we’ve been working on Active GRP and Active View metrics and building that into all our products.

Impact is harder. Recently we announced a brand lift survey product where we can run surveys to users who have seen the ad. We also made the biggest change to Google Analytics in a long time. We redesigned it so we can have an understanding of data coming from different screens, different systems like customer relationship management, etc.

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