Social Video ROI: Relationships That Convert

Many marketers assume “social video” mostly means sharing on YouTube, Facebook, and other social networks. What’s forgotten? The “social” part.

To successfully incorporate video into your search marketing, you really need to create a experience that’s first and foremost about building personal connections. That means genuinely listening, engaging, and helping others in ways that turn visitors into followers, users into contributors, critics into evangelists, and individuals into communities.

But social video can’t be helpful if it can’t be sustainable as a business model. That’s why social video needs to be treated like a financial portfolio – nurturing relationships like one nurtures stock investments, carefully qualified and continually measured against pre-set performance goals so you see a tangible return on investment over the long-term.

What is “Social Video?” What Should it Really Mean?

We need to start with how we choose to define “social. I regard social as a personal investment into genuine relationships for shared value.

The next step from there is “social business” – a term often used to describe the evolution of modern business through technology and consumer culture, and worker relationships. That is how I came to my definition of “social video” – the blending of video into genuine relationships for shared value.

Too often, video is still treated as a broadcast tool with expectations of short-term transactions, rather than a true engagement tool for building meaningful connections.

You should no longer ask, “How do I create a viral video?” Instead, you should ask, “How can I create value and build trust with my audience?”

“Video is one of the greatest ways to help personalize the brand and create a trusted experience,” according to Frank Eliason, SVP of Citibank and author of “@ Your Service – How to Attract New Customers, Increase Sales, and Increase Sales Using New Customer Techniques.” “We tend to trust humans, not some corporate logo; and video is the best way to do that on a scaled basis.”

Externally, video is used to communicate to broad audiences, often designed to bring a human touch to a brand. It’s a great way to share insight into your company, share thoughts, and add value to your customers without intruding into their conversation.

Internally, larger companies are using video to create more nimble, interconnected teams. Work groups now live in a very different environment. Today, people use video to speak with each other across the globe, for knowledge management and collaboration.

Here are some other strong business reasons for why search marketers should be doing social video:

  • Video is the most powerful communications tool on the web. It invites more engagement with audiences, and drives the social signals with Google for augmented search results.
  • Video enhances storytelling. People are moved by stories; and video is better at storytelling than text, graphics, and audio combined.
  • Video augments both the rational and the emotional. Some audiences are persuaded more by logic and instructional content; others are motivated more by strong feelings of passion that are either positive or negative.
  • Audiences now expect it. Your audiences are likely creating and sharing their own videos, and want the brands they follow to do the same with them in mind.

Social Video Tips for Every Professional Marketer

  • Make it a real commitment to personally engage with your audience. Anything advertised as “social” should come with a promise. It’s not just putting out video content regularly and consistently to where your audience is; it’s a promise to listen and personally engage with individual followers and subscribers (i.e., conversation), and to provide mutual value for what you share. Simply placing repurposed ads on your website or YouTube channel isn’t going to cut it.
  • Be transparent and believable. Zappos has always lead the way but that’s because social fits within their existing culture. Mistakes happen in social when brands like to portray themselves as something they are not. That means, think about what your existing business culture is like, and have your video content be a natural representation of that same culture.
  • Always start with being helpful. The best video you can create is never going to make up for poor customer experience. The best companies winning in social media aren’t doing so because of a marketing or PR message. They are winning because their products and experiences live up to their brand promise. If you do social video without reviewing, acknowledging, and demonstrating a serious attempt to fix those issues, your online video will just invite conversations from upset customers that you aren’t giving them attention like you should.
  • Use it to learn about, acknowledge and correct your mistakes. “My favorite example will always be the a Domino’s pizza response to crisis on YouTube a few years back. That is the power of video where the CEO is speaking from the heart,” Eliason said. One thing you should never do is ignore someone who puts up a video genuinely expressing their bad experience with your brand. “They care enough to talk about your brand, so that tells me they are passionate. If they did not care they would not say anything.”
  • Acknowledge interesting videos, not just interesting people. “Some of the famous instances over the years. I worked for a cable company [Comcast] and at one point there was a video of a technician sleeping,” Eliason said. “The person who put that video up had posted two videos, ever. Let’s face it, it was just good content. It was just something we enjoyed watching – so we watched it over and over again.

Social Video Strategy in 3 Simple Steps: Start Soft, Then Get Hard

The word “social” in media should never be an excuse to avoid showing measurable business outcomes; nor should social be measured under the exact same metrics that apply to direct marketing and traditional advertising.

The key part is demonstrating causality – connecting the dots between the “soft” metrics of engagement towards the “hard” metrics of transactions and financials. Here are three simple steps how you can achieve that:

  1. Set measurable performance goals. Before starting any video campaign, have a clear objective of what you’re looking to accomplish that will be a positive business value. Set a budget for your spend and time investments, and how you plan to get in the positive column with sales and revenue over a period of time. Think anywhere from 6-18 months, and be ready to measure intermittently so you can see your progress toward your goal.
  2. Know the social metrics that really matter. Go beyond views and shares. Focus on the metrics show sustainable engagement – audience retention and completion of video views, subscribers, clicks on calls-to-actions and soft leads (like filling out a short form or becoming an email newsletter member). Social business pros already understand that word-of-mouth marketing is a proven connection between traffic and sales,
  3. Create a scorecard and regular report system. This means assigning different values to different social metrics. Once you have data coming in, you can start to see how many of the soft metrics it takes to generate the hard metrics. From there you have a benchmark for ongoing and future campaigns, and you can use the numbers to compare performance over the past week or month, and measure growth.

Screw Viral, Tube Responsibly!

Social video is most apt to be successful for your business when you stop thinking about “going viral” and really focus on being useful.

Think of social video less like a megaphone and more like a customer specialist or concierge, building interesting and helpful video content that acknowledges their needs and wants; and personally engage with audience members individually around the video experience. You’ll see how good will with a responsible business plan behind it leads to social video success.

Work together with us to create a social video and generate success!

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Video Content Drives Social Engagement and Gains Ground on Mobile [Report]

A new report from Adobe shows the formidable impact that video content is having on our online viewing habits and how publishers and marketers can benefit from this upward trend by understanding what the public wants. The U.S. Digital Video Benchmark 2012 Review, which draws its data from just under 20 billion video starts on media websites as well as 10 billion videos ads served by Adobe media customers alongside 450 million Facebook posts, states that video content has twice the social engagement of text, links and static images. Not only is the medium finding success on social network sites, the report finds that mobile video views increased by a staggering 300% in 2012, and accounts for 10.4% of all video starts.

Adobe even made a video of the report so let’s take a look at that first for a quick overview:

Mobile Video

Although viewers in the US still continue to watch the majority of the video content via their PCs, consumption via mobile devices increased significantly last year. Mobile video views are up by 300% which makes up 10.4% of all video starts.

Video Content Drives Social Engagement, Gains Ground on Mobile [Report]

Video viewing via tablet devices tends to peak at the weekends and is driven by longer form content such as sports, films and TV shows. Mobile viewing habits tend to favour video consumption on a Monday, Thursday and Sunday and revolves around “content snacking” of shorter video clips.

Video Content Drives Social Engagement, Gains Ground on Mobile [Report]

Social Media

In 2012, video social engagement rose from 42% to 70% the year before with the viral reach of video content (the number of people who discover a video via a friend or a brand they follow) accounted for 77% of ALL reach via social networking sites. That compares to 55% for non-video content. Adobe found that this type of video also has a much higher completion rate. People are taking the time to watch the whole thing if the recommendation has come via their social circle.

Facebook still has the lead when it comes to these social referrals but Twitter is three times more likely to generate referral traffic for videos than other types of content such as text links or images.

Video Content Drives Social Engagement, Gains Ground on Mobile [Report]

Some other key findings:
• Digital video consumption has grown 30% year over year in Q4 2012.
• From Q3 to Q4 2012 alone, video consumption grew 13%.
• There has been 50% growth in video streams since Q1 2011.
• New TV and sports content drove the highest growth in video streams in Q4 2012.

You can download the report from Adobe here for further information on last year’s video trends in content and advertising.

Online Video Rankings – Fullscreen Climbs to #2 in YouTube Partner Channels Ranking

comScore released data from the comScore Video Metrix service showing that 182 million U.S. Internet users watched 38.7 billion online content videos in December, while video ad views totaled 11.3 billion.

Top 10 Video Content Properties by Unique Viewers

Google Sites, driven primarily by video viewing at YouTube.com, ranked as the top online video content property in December with 153 million unique viewers, followed by Facebook.com with 58.8 million, VEVO with 51.6 million, NDN with 49.9 million and Yahoo! Sites with 47.5 million. Nearly 38.7 billion video content views occurred during the month, with Google Sites generating the highest number at 13.2 billion, followed by AOL, Inc. with 692 million. Google Sites had the highest average engagement among the top ten properties.

Top U.S. Online Video Content Properties Ranked by Unique Video Viewers
December 2012
Total U.S. – Home and Work Locations
Content Videos Only (Ad Videos Not Included)
Source: comScore Video Metrix
Property Total Unique Viewers (000) Videos (000)* Minutes per Viewer
Total Internet : Total Audience  181,717 38,673,322 1,150.2
Google Sites 152,971 13,181,969 388.3
Facebook.com 58,776 419,959 16.4
VEVO 51,640 592,463 39.3
NDN 49,942 510,319 69.5
Yahoo! Sites 47,516 383,514 51.5
AOL, Inc. 42,425 692,467 55.0
Viacom Digital 42,334 431,833 39.4
Microsoft Sites 40,604 472,812 39.4
Amazon Sites 38,129 138,968 10.3
Grab Media, Inc. 34,911 203,512 28.8

*A video is defined as any streamed segment of audiovisual content, including both progressive downloads and live streams. For long-form, segmented content, (e.g. television episodes with ad pods in the middle) each segment of the content is counted as a distinct video stream.Video views are inclusive of both user-initiated and auto-played videos that are viewed for longer than 3 seconds.

Top 10 Video Ad Properties by Video Ads Viewed

Americans viewed 11.3 billion video ads in December, with Google Sites ranking first with nearly 2 billion ads. BrightRoll Video Network came in second with 1.8 billion, followed by Liverail.com with 1.8 billion, Adap.tv with 1.5 billion and Hulu with 1.5 billion. Time spent watching video ads totaled 4.1 billion minutes, with BrightRoll Video Network delivering the highest duration of video ads at 966 million minutes. Video ads reached 53 percent of the total U.S. population an average of 70 times during the month. Hulu delivered the highest frequency of video ads to its viewers with an average of 65, while Google Sites delivered an average of 20 ads per viewer.

Top U.S. Online Video Ad Properties Ranked by Video Ads* Viewed
December 2012
Total U.S. – Home and Work Locations
Ad Videos Only (Content Videos Not Included)
Source: comScore Video Metrix
Property Video Ads (000) Total Ad Minutes (MM) Frequency (Ads per Viewer) % Reach Total U.S. Population
Total Internet : Total Audience  11,322,657 4,135 69.9 52.6
Google Sites 1,998,861 155 20.0 32.4
BrightRoll Video Network** 1,826,453 966 13.8 43.1
LiveRail.com† 1,797,940 813 18.2 32.1
Adap.TV† 1,541,695 741 11.7 42.9
Hulu 1,454,115 584 64.9 7.3
Specific Media** 988,399 419 7.7 41.6
TubeMogul Video Ad Platform† 783,934 297 8.4 30.3
Tremor Video** 743,969 361 8.6 28.0
Auditude, Inc.** 736,787 153 12.8 18.7
Videology** 632,977 337 7.5 27.3

*Video ads include streaming-video advertising only and do not include other types of video monetization, such as overlays, branded players, matching banner ads, etc.
**Indicates video ad network
†Indicates video ad exchange/DSP/SSP

Top 10 YouTube Partner Channels by Unique Viewers

The December 2012 YouTube partner data revealed that video music channel VEVO maintained the top position in the ranking with 50.5 million viewers. Fullscreen climbed into the #2 position for the first time with 31.1 million viewers, followed by Maker Studios Inc. with 30 million, Warner Music with 26 million and Machinima with 26 million. Among the top 10 YouTube partners, Machinima demonstrated the highest engagement (68 minutes per viewer) followed by Maker Studios (44 minutes per viewer). VEVO streamed the greatest number of videos (565 million), followed by Machinima (503 million).

Top YouTube Partner Channels* Ranked by Unique Video Viewers
December 2012
Total U.S. – Home and Work Locations
Content Videos Only (Ad Videos Not Included)
Source: comScore Video Metrix
Property Total Unique Viewers (000) Videos (000) Minutes per Viewer
VEVO @ YouTube 50,485 564,531 37.9
Fullscreen @ YouTube 31,079 191,159 19.1
Maker Studios Inc. @ YouTube 30,013 362,971 43.6
Warner Music @ Youtube 26,025 141,622 18.1
Machinima @ YouTube 25,994 502,656 68.1
BroadbandTV @ YouTube 13,370 79,937 18.1
Collective Digital Studio @ YouTube 9,281 59,197 20.2
ygent @ YouTube 8,640 25,991 9.4
Alloy Digital @ YouTube 8,582 57,643 25.2
MOVIECLIPS @ YouTube 8,471 29,729 9.3

*YouTube Partner Reporting based on online video content viewing and does not include claimed user-generated content

Other notable findings from December 2012 include:

  • 84.9 percent of the U.S. Internet audience viewed online video.
  • The duration of the average online content video was 5.4 minutes, while the average online video ad was 0.4 minutes.
  • Video ads accounted for 22.6 percent of all videos viewed and 1.9 percent of all minutes spent viewing video online.

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10 most social videos of 2012

Nike at the Olympics

Nike is known for using guerrilla marketing tactics to try and steal the limelight from its competitors, and during the London Olympics it managed to outshine official sponsor Adidas with a massive billboard and social campaign around the capital.

Nike eschewed the usual celebrity endorsements in a campaign that celebrated everyday athletes. It bought up hundreds of billboards around the city featuring the hashtag ‘#findgreatness’.

Adidas, which spent tens of millions of pounds to be an official sponsor, ran a campaign featuring Team GB athletes and the hashtag ‘#takethestage’.

According to Socialbakers’ CheerMeter there were more than 16,000 tweets associating Nike with the word Olympic between 27 July and 2 August compared to 9,295 for Adidas.

Furthermore. Nike attracted 166,718 new Facebook fans during the Games versus 80,761 for Adidas.

Data from Experian Hitwise shows that Nike achieved a 6% growth in its number of Facebook fans and a 77% boost in engagement on its Facebook page compared to 2% and 59% respectively for Adidas.

Dumb Ways To Die

I became aware of this campaign thanks to Vivienne Egan’s excellent blog post about why it’s achieved such huge viral success.

The video is a catchy tune created by a public transport authority in Melbourne, Australia, aimed at raising awareness about railway safety.

I don’t know whether it will actually prevent any train accidents, but you’d hope that the video had an impact on at least one of the 30m people who have watched it since it went live two weeks ago.

Dollar Shave Club

Male grooming can be an expensive business, particularly when buying branded razors on a regular basis.

Spotting a gap in the market, Michael Dubin set up Dollar Shave Club to provide men with new razors for just $1 a month.

In this brilliantly quirky video Dubin describes his businesses service in the company’s warehouse amid increasingly bizarre scenes.

It’s not only extremely funny, but also does a great job of convincing the viewer to sign up to Dollar Shave Club.

Cadbury

Social media lies at the heart of Cadbury’s marketing activities, and we‘ve reported on a number of product launches this year that used Facebook and Google+.

One of its most interesting social campaigns was to celebrate the brand reaching 1m Facebook fans.

Cadbury realised that despite having so many fans, only 16% of them ever saw content that the brand posted on Facebook.

The challenge was to increase the engagement among its fans, as well as reaching friends of fans and the wider Facebook community.

To test what content users would engage with, Cadbury decided to build a giant Facebook ‘like’ thumb out of pieces of Dairy Milk.

It used teaser ads in the build up to the event, then live streamed in a studio decorated with user-generated content and photos. The team also responded to user requests and comments in the video.

As a result, Cadbury gained 40,000 Facebook fans and more than 350,000 people were actively involved in the campaign. Some fans even left the live feed running for hours on end.

Prometheus

Back in May 20th Century Fox tried to tap into the viral power of Twitter to promote the release of Ridley Scott’s sci-fi movie Prometheus.

A new three-minute trailer for the film was screened simultaneously online, on Channel 4 and on social TV app Zeebox.

Viewers were then encouraged to tweet about the film using the hashtag #areyouseeingthis.

During the next ad break, Channel 4 screened a 40 second spot which included viewer’s tweets.

Analysis from 1000heads shows that there was a spike in activity, peaking at around 4,000 tweets, with the campaign potentially reaching around 15m users.

At the time I suggested that the reliance on traditional media meant that the campaign wasn’t particularly innovative, but I still think it’s a noteworthy example of a studio using social to promote a new movie.

Old Spice

Old Spice is responsible for some of the most memorable viral campaigns ever created (“I’m on a horse”), and this year it ditched its Old Spice Guy character for an interactive video involving ex-NFL player Terry Crews.

After watching a short video of Crews playing musical instruments by flexing his muscles, viewers could then use their keyboard to play their own tune.

It has little to do with the product and everything to do with the brand, and has now clocked up 8m views on Vimeo.

Heinz

Heinz is another FMCG brand that frequently uses social to build excitement around its product launches.

As part of the marketing activities around a new Five Beanz variety, Heinz created a Facebook quiz app that told people what kind of bean they had grown up to become in response to a series of questions about their personality traits.

To encourage people to take part and share the app, five winners were picked every hour and sent a personalised bean and every user that invited 10 people to take the quiz was given a goodie bag. Heinz also offered Facebook fans a coupon so they could try the product.

The campaign ran for two weeks and achieved impressive results:

  • 22,143 took the quiz to apply for a personalised bean.
  • More than 10,000 users shared the app.
  • The campaign reached 10.8m people on Facebook.
  • It reached 3m people reached outside of Facebook through Twitter, blogs and news sites.
  • The Heinz Facebook community grew by 30,000 extra fans.

Heineken

Never one to endorse brands shamelessly chasing Facebook ‘likes’, I was in two minds whether to include this campaign on the list.

However Heineken went beyond the usual “like us and we’ll give you a discount” tactic employed by many brands and instead offered to blow up one green balloon in its office for every new ‘like’ it got on its Brazilian fan page.

Heineken even personalised the campaign by reading out the names of some of the users on YouTube.

This is another great example of a fun, interactive campaign that is more about the brand than the product itself.

It earned Heineken thousands of new fans and helped to improve brand awareness in an emerging market.

Telenet

A Belgian TV station setup a dramatic set piece in a town square to advertise a new TV station, involving a shoot out, fights and American football players.

To kick off the over-the-top action sequence, members of the public had to press a red button in the square with a sign saying ‘Push to add drama.’

As is often the case with viral videos, you’re never quite sure whether the members of the public are indeed genuinely unaware of what’s going on, but you can’t really argue with 39m YouTube views.

Mini USA

This video technically went live on YouTube at the end of December 2011, but I thought it was good enough to sneak onto the list anyway.

A social media marketing campaign with a healthy budget – Mini asked people to describe the best test drive ever in six words.

Matthew Foster came up with the winning entry and became the star of an ad to promote the launch of the new Mini Cooper.

It’s had less than 700,000 views on YouTube, but contains stewardesses, salt flats, paratroopers, sushi and a random rock band name Falconer. What’s not to love?

BrightRoll Video Network Climbs to #1 in Video Ad Ranking

comScore, a leader in measuring the digital world, today released data from the comScore Video Metrix service showing that 183 million U.S. Internet users watched more than 37 billion online content videos in October, while video ad views reached nearly 11 billion.

Top 10 Video Content Properties by Unique Viewers

Google Sites, driven primarily by video viewing at YouTube.com, ranked as the top online video content property in October with 153.2 million unique viewers, followed by Yahoo! Sites with 55.3 million, NDN with 53.2 million, VEVO with 53.1 million and AOL, Inc. with 53.1 million. More than 37 billion video content views occurred during the month, with Google Sites generating the highest number at 13 billion, followed by AOL, Inc. with 711 million. Google Sites had the highest average engagement among the top ten properties.

Top U.S. Online Video Content Properties Ranked by Unique Video Viewers
October 2012
Total U.S. – Home and Work Locations
Content Videos Only (Ad Videos Not Included)
Source: comScore Video Metrix
Property Total Unique Viewers (000) Videos (000)* Minutes per Viewer
Total Internet : Total Audience  182,574 37,242,927 1,254.4
Google Sites 153,212 13,028,148 399.5
Yahoo! Sites 55,253 496,318 53.1
NDN 53,215 550,884 74.3
VEVO 53,105 628,958 40.5
AOL, Inc. 53,089 711,008 45.6
Facebook.com 47,870 252,934 13.3
Viacom Digital 40,914 391,700 43.8
Microsoft Sites 37,214 432,457 43.8
CBS Interactive 31,805 297,749 59.9
Grab Media, Inc. 31,647 157,946 27.5

*A video is defined as any streamed segment of audiovisual content, including both progressive downloads and live streams. For long-form, segmented content, (e.g. television episodes with ad pods in the middle) each segment of the content is counted as a distinct video stream.Video views are inclusive of both user-initiated and auto-played videos that are viewed for longer than 3 seconds.

Top 10 Video Ad Properties by Video Ads Viewed

Americans viewed nearly 11 billion video ads in October, with each of the top 5 video ad properties delivering more than 1-billion video ads. BrightRoll Video Network captured first place with more than 1.8 billion ads, followed by Google Sites with more than 1.7 billion, Hulu with 1.5 billion, Liverail.com with 1.2 billion and Adap.tv with 1.1 billion. Time spent watching video ads totaled 3.8 billion minutes, with BrightRoll Video Network delivering the highest duration of video ads at 897 million minutes. Video ads reached 52 percent of the total U.S. population an average of 68 times during the month. Hulu delivered the highest frequency of video ads to its viewers with an average of 59, while Google Sites delivered an average of 19 ads per viewer.

Top U.S. Online Video Ad Properties Ranked by Video Ads* Viewed
October 2012
Total U.S. – Home and Work Locations
Ad Videos Only (Content Videos Not Included)
Source: comScore Video Metrix
Property Video Ads (000) Total Ad Minutes (MM) Frequency (Ads per Viewer) % Reach Total U.S. Population
Total Internet : Total Audience  10,887,079 3,820 68.2 51.9
BrightRoll Video Network** 1,827,703 897 12.0 49.3
Google Sites 1,750,845 140 19.1 29.8
Hulu 1,543,196 618 58.8 8.5
LiveRail.com† 1,241,123 540 12.4 32.6
ADAP.TV† 1,091,077 560 9.7 36.4
Auditude, Inc.** 910,734 220 13.4 22.2
TubeMogul Video Ad Platform† 832,198 372 8.8 30.9
Tremor Video** 790,646 384 9.0 28.5
Specific Media** 766,570 339 6.4 39.2
AdExcite Video Ad Network** 728,123 303 8.0 29.5

*Video ads include streaming-video advertising only and do not include other types of video monetization, such as overlays, branded players, matching banner ads, etc.
**Indicates video ad network
†Indicates video ad exchange/DSP/SSP

Top 10 YouTube Partner Channels by Unique Viewers

The October 2012 YouTube partner data revealed that video music channel VEVO maintained the top position in the ranking with 52.2 million viewers. Machinima climbed into the #2 position with 35.1 million viewers, followed by Maker Studios Inc. with 28.9 million, Warner Music with 26.3 million and Fullscreen with 25.1 million. Among the top 10 YouTube partners, Machinima demonstrated the highest engagement (49 minutes per viewer) followed by VEVO (39 minutes per viewer). VEVO streamed the greatest number of videos (603 million), followed by Machinima (521 million).

Top YouTube Partner Channels* Ranked by Unique Video Viewers
October 2012
Total U.S. – Home and Work Locations
Content Videos Only (Ad Videos Not Included)
Source: comScore Video Metrix
Property Total Unique Viewers (000) Videos (000) Minutes per Viewer
VEVO @ YouTube 52,183 603,474 39.2
Machinima @ YouTube 35,091 520,903 48.9
Maker Studios Inc. @ YouTube 28,896 295,979 35.8
Warner Music @ Youtube 26,315 139,987 17.5
Fullscreen @ YouTube 25,141 138,436 16.1
BroadbandTV @ YouTube 12,806 72,537 18.0
ygent @ YouTube 11,680 34,846 10.3
Alloy Digital @ YouTube 7,959 37,102 15.3
Rightster @ YouTube 7,579 17,148 6.3
disney abcnews @ YouTube 7,380 14,198 7.1

*YouTube Partner Reporting based on online video content viewing and does not include claimed user-generated content

Other notable findings from October 2012 include:

  • 86 percent of the U.S. Internet audience viewed online video.
  • The duration of the average online content video was 6.1 minutes, while the average online video ad was 0.4 minutes.
  • Video ads accounted for 22.6 percent of all videos viewed and 1.6 percent of all minutes spent viewing video online.