Peek of the Week – The Top 20 Most Shared Online Video Ads For June 2014

World Cup ads predictably dominate this month’s Unruly Global Ads Chart. With the biggest sporting event on the planet in full swing, it’s no surprise to see almost half of the top 20 video ads of the month are football-related. Just like last month, Colombian pop princess Shakira’s collaboration with yoghurt brand Activia “La La La” leads the way. Dubbed the ‘unofficial World Cup theme song’, it attracted a mammoth 2.72 million shares during June, making it not only the most shared football ad of the year, but also the sixth most shared ad of all time.

Brands unaffiliated with this year’s World Cup have certainly dominated this year’s World Cup. Despite creating half as many videos as FIFA-affiliated advertisers, commercials from non-sponsors have so far generated almost three-quarters of the shares. As with previous World Cups, Nike is one of the standout stars, so far attracting more than three times more shares than its fiercest rival adidas, who has been an official World Cup sponsor since 1970.

This month’s chart features two ads from the Oregon-based company. In second spot is “The Last Game”, an ad designed in a style familiar to Pixar films like Toy Story or The Incredibles. It depicts a world in which homogenous clone footballers have taken over the sport, leaving mavericks like Zlatan and Neymar Jr. to take other professions, such as hairdressers. It’s a little like the town that banned dancing in Footloose, only with Wayne Rooney instead of Kevin Bacon.

Seeing hugely famous athletes Disney-fied up is a strange joy, and the short film flies by with wit and imagination. With nearly 900,000 shares last month alone, it won’t be Nike’s last game either. Nike’s epic “Winner Stays” also makes June’s top 20 (18th), while adidas’ “House Match”, featuring David Beckham, is eighth.

In fourth is another ad from a brand not affiliated with the World Cup – Beats By Dre’s “Game Before The Game”. Backed up by a rousing soundtrack from Jamie N Commons & The X Ambassadors, the video features football stars and fans preparing for the match of their lives by going through their various superstitious pre-match rites. Neymar listens to a message from his dad, Cesc Fabregas kisses his ring four times, while Luis Suarez kisses the tattoo on his wrist of his children’s names. It’s an incredible watch, enough to get the pulses racing of even the most ardent football refuseniks.

Other new football-related ads to make it on to the top 20 are Banco de Chile’s compelling “Comercial Mineros” and a commercial from Middle-Eastern telecommunications company Ooredoo which stars Argentinian soccer superstar Lionel Messi. Castrol’s “Footkhana” is still the most shared ad from an official partner.

But World Cup ads did not have it all their own way during June. After scoring a huge social video hit last year with its wickedly funny “The Camp Gyno”, tampon subscription service HelloFlo returned last month with yet another fresh approach to feminine hygiene marketing. Created to promote its period starter kit, “First Moon Party” features a young girl so desperate to join her “blood sisters” at school she paints red nail varnish on a sanitary towel to fake her first period. Her mum quickly rumbles her, but plays along, organising what can only be described as the party from hell to celebrate her daughter’s milestone.

The result is probably the funniest ad about tampons ever made. Intentionally funny, at least. And judging by the ad’s immediate success, I’m not the only one giggling. The video has already surpassed the original, attracting 232,306 shares in just over a week, making it the ninth most shared ad last month. With lines like “Grandpa is bobbing for ovaries like a champ” and “do you know how hard it is to find a uterus pinata?”, the ad’s edgy humour and awkward subject matter will certainly not be to everyone’s tastes. But you certainly have to take your hat off to HelloFlo for coming up with a piece of content that would not look out of place during an episode of hit US TV show Modern Family.

Another feminine care brand also makes it on to this month’s top 20. But unlike HelloFlo’s humorous spot, P&G brand Always uses a more inspirational message to get people sharing its ad, “Like A Girl”. Directed by notable documentary photographer and filmmaker Lauren Greenfield, whose work has cataloged the self-esteem crisis among American females, the video empowers young women to turn an insulting phrase into a positive affirmation.

As one participant observes the end of the film, “why can’t ‘run like a girl’ also mean ‘win the race’?”. It’s a compelling message, which certainly resonated across the social web last month. Attracting more than 219,00 shares in just a few days, “Like A Girl” was the 11th most shared ad during June.

Other new ads to make it into the top 20 this month include a safety ad from Volkswagen that is sure to make you think twice about texting while driving and trailers for the latest chapters of the successful video game franchises FIFA, Assassin’s Creed, Mortal Kombat and Grand Theft Auto.

 

Three Big Reasons Why Every Brand Needs an ‘About Us’ Video

While many people now realize the value of traditional videos like a sales and marketing video or a training video, they are just now starting to realize the incredible value of an About Us video. It’s a great time to pitch new and past clients on this powerful tool that can be used in so many ways. The great thing about an About Us video is that it’s so versatile. Clients can use them for marketing and branding as well as recruiting and educating. Let’s take a look at some of the ways you can use video to further your corporate message.

#1 For Marketing and Branding

The About Us page is often the second most popular page on a website, second only to the home page. People want to know who is behind the product or service. Having a video on the About Us page allows a deeper understanding of the people who they will be dealing with if they select the company.

The best way to approach an About Us video is to start the video with an interview of a past client. Allowing your prospects to view your company through the eyes of a client allows you to establish credibility and empathy in a powerful way. The client reinforces your marketing and branding messages by talking about their experience as well as how and why they chose your company. While not all companies want to include a client testimonial, I highly recommend it. Your prospect likely have the same needs and concerns. While your competition might be focused on text and photos that are meant to show how great they are, you will be focusing on your client’s needs.

Branding messages and marketing messages should also be bolstered through the company’s representatives. It’s a good idea for the company representatives to talk about this client and others and how they serve the needs of all their clients. Through allowing potential clients to “meet the people” in your company, you’ll be able to establish a greater bond. I also recommend really showing your passion for your business in these types of videos. Your text on the page can cover the facts. But, video can create an engaging, emotional connection. Keeping site visitors engaged longer on your site also helps in your search engine optimization. Since people are very likely to view this page, it’s a great idea to keep them engaged and show them your passion through the most powerful communication tool available – video.

One of the best examples of marketing and branding comes from Dollar Shave club, who took a controversial, yet powerful approach to reach new consumers:

#2 For Recruitment

When people hear about your company’s job openings, they will almost assuredly visit your website and check out your About Us page. Having a video that prospective applicants can watch is a great idea. They can get a feel for who you are and who you serve. They should also gain a greater understanding of your values and your mission. It’s also a great idea to include your staff in the video so that the job seekers get a feel for your company’s diversity and the attitude and demographics of the people working there.

Prospective clients and job seekers should also learn the history of the company. Through all of this subtle information, the applicant finds out whether they might be a good fit for your company and whether your company is a good fit for them. Today’s employers realize the value of recruiting someone who feels at home and will stay. The About Us video is another tool for engaging prospects and helping to reduce the wasted time of interviewing someone who really wouldn’t be a good fit and doesn’t realize it until they show up at your office. The following is a fantastic example of a recruitment video, from Apple:

A slightly less formal approach can be risky but in certain areas, like tech start-ups, it can work. We love this recruitment video from SnazzyRoom, which doesn’t take itself seriously at all, but still gets the message across:

#3 For Employee Buy-in

Educating your current associates and your new hires about your company is a great additional value from your About Us video. Anyone who applies to your company, becomes a client, or already works for there should be able to quickly and effectively articulate your company’s value in the marketplace. Having current associates watch the video and having new hires view it during an orientation will give all your staff a better understanding of your company’s overall value. Almost every employer realizes that when one of their associates is asked to “tell someone about the company”, many people struggle with what to say. Educating current and new associates about your company’s history and value is crucial to strengthening your brand. Of course, many company videos are kept in-house so only employees get to see them. If you are going to make any corporate videos public, then don’t make the mistake of producing embarrassing content that your staff or clients will want to disassociate themselves from, like this offering from the IRS:

So, creating one, strong, inclusive About Us video will help you land more clients, bolster your search engine optimization, hire associates who are more likely to stay, and increase your current staff’s understanding of your value in the market. What a great investment! It’s like hiring a salesperson who works 24/7 on your website.

Why not let us help you make your marketing budget go further?  Email Robert Baldwin or call +44 (0) 7922 138 666.

 

YOUR GUIDE TO YOUTUBE AD FORMATS: WHERE TO ADVERTISE, AND WHY

Knowing what you want to achieve is an important first step for any successful YouTube marketing strategy, and it’s no different when it comes to launching an advertising campaign. Whether you want to increase a video’s view count or drive viewers to off YouTube pages, having a clear objective at the outset will help you determine where, and how, to position your ads.

Pairing the right ad placements with your specific objective is the most fundamental way to make sure you’re getting the most value out of your marketing budget. Here’s a brief guide that lays out which ad formats to use for some of the most common KPIs on YouTube.

Objective: Increasing a video’s view count

Currently, there are three different kinds of TrueView ads to consider when looking to increase the view count for a specific video – “In-Stream,” “In-Search” and “In-Display.” (Note: starting later in Q2 of 2014, YouTube is combining the “In-Search” and “In-Display” formats under one name and calling the combination “In-Display”).  All three types are able to increment the view count of a video when run as an ad, assuming the viewer stays around long enough based on the type of placement. Here are the distinctions to know:

1) TrueView In-Stream

youtube-paid-media1 copy

These ads run as skippable pre-rolls before a given video. The view increment occurs when a user watches the ad for at least 30 seconds. If the user hits the “Skip Ad” button, or bounces off the page, no view will be registered. Here is an example of a 30 second Trueview commercial we produced for our client Simply Business;

2) TrueView In-Search

youtube paid media 4

These ads will appear as promoted suggested videos in the search results page. Once a user clicks on the video link, the view will increment as soon as that video begins.

3) TrueView In-Display

youtube paid media 5

These ads appear as promoted suggested videos in the related videos column. Like “In-Search,” the view increment is counted after a user has clicked on the video link and the video beings to play.

Bonus Objective: Build an audience on your channel

The TrueView ads can also help build an audience on your channel.  If a user sees your content as a TrueView ad,  they are more likely to visit your channel and watch additional content, garnering you “earned views” as a result of your “paid views.”  Furthermore, if a user really enjoys your content, they will occasionally subscribe to your channel.

Objective: Driving conversions and visits to off YouTube pages

In addition to promoting content on YouTube channels, many publishers are increasing investment in YouTube as a promotional vehicle to introduce audiences to content that lives off of YouTube — setting aside promotional budgets to launch new shows, in much the same way as traditional TV debuts new shows. Here are the ads best used to drive those conversions:

1) Non-Skippable 15 second pre-rolls

youtube-paid-media1

These ads run before a given video with no skip option. They do not increment view counts on a video, but they have proven to be very “clicky” placements that can drive conversions – ticket sales, signups for a service, etc., and visits to an off YouTube domain.  Many advertisers port 30 second TV ads straight to YouTube – just because a video is longer doesn’t mean that it is necessarily better, depending on your objective.  For a direct response / conversion objective, we’ve found that 15 second spots consistently outperform 30 second ones. This is an example our 15 second commercial for Simply Business;

2) 480×70 in video overlays (+300×250 companions)

youtube paid media 6

These ads are specific to YouTube only and appear on the lower third of a video. They can support a 300×250 companion banner on the right side of the page as well. These ads are relatively inexpensive to run and can be especially effective when used against remarketing lists. As of now, overlays are limited to laptop/PC inventory only.

3) 300×250 display banners

These ads appear on the right side of the watch page, as seen in Ellen screenshot above. Most online marketers will have this unit created already, so they’re fine to use if it’s the only available creative. However, 480x70s are far more effective and can run the 300×250 alongside it for no additional cost. 300×250 banners are also limited to laptop/PC inventory only.

4) GDN Text Links

These ads appear throughout the Google Display Network (GDN) as contextual placements to complement a search. These ads are usually able to run at a low price point but don’t often drive conversions at scale.

Key Takeaway

So, before you charge headfirst into your first marketing campaign on YouTube, consider what your goals are and build your creative accordingly. Deciding where to focus your efforts becomes that much clearer, leading to more valuable results, reeldealhd – bespoke video production can help you with this process, with affordable TrueView commercials and bespoke video production services.

Why not let us help you make your marketing budget go further?  Email Robert Baldwin or call +44 (0) 7922 138 666.

 

Pre-roll Ads Most Tolerable Video Ad Format [Report]

Yahoo! surveyed 1,775 consumers in the 16-44 age range who are regular online video viewers, several time a week at the least. Some of the results seem counter-intuitive to what many other reports have found. I guess it depends on who you survey, what platform you survey form and when you survey.

Paying for video seems to be not all that popular with the Yahoo! survey respondents. Just 35% said they would make micro payments for video while just 25% would pay monthly subscription fees for video. But the question is, are they talking about things like news video clips you find on Yahoo!? I mean, presumably, the audience they surveyed was theirs and not say, Netflix users.

Now, 35% of the U.S. online video viewing population is about 66 million people so that’s not all that bad. 25% is 47.25 million and that would be a fairly large SVOD subscriber base.

The research also showed that the video viewers are pretty ad savvy. Over half (57%) expect online advertising to be “more interactive.” More interactive than what immediately sprang to my mind. Than TV or print? Surely. Than other forms of digital advertising? Well, who knows, because I can’t find the exact wording of the question.

Privacy seems to be less of an issue to these surveyed consumers;

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 13.09.07

 

 

Nearly half of the respondents expect online advertising to be relevant to them and 55% expect to have some choice in the ads that are shown to them. So overall, about half of the respondents are ad savvy where they have some passing familiarity with interactivity, engagement, ad relevance and targeting and ad choice, presumably in pre-roll ads.

The quality expectation for online video content has come close to that from TV.

Screen Shot 2014-01-30 at 13.08.14

This question seems a bit leading to me. Were they asking about appealing or disruptive or a combination of both? Take a look at this slide from a Yahoo! presentation of the results (the typo is theirs I assure you). It’s entirely possible that the “How acceptabile [sic] are each of these ads ?” was the exact question I suppose.

yahoo video ad format acceptance

Here’s that part where I said tolerable because just 22% said that pre-rolls are more acceptable, apparently in regards to the others. Second was interactive ads which had an 18% approval rating, even though in the same slide show 57% said they expect the ads to be more interactive. Sponsorships also got 18% of the vote. Tied at 15% were banner and wrapped banners and mid-rolls were least acceptable in the reported results.

For video player ads there’s a 10% difference in acceptance of mid-roll and pre-roll. I hate pre-rolls personally, especially when the ad is paired with a piece of content that is less than 200% of the ad length. In terms of relevant targeting, 42% said they would be happy to share shopping information to get more relevant ads, another 42% said they might consider it and 16% said No .

Finally a few key take aways for advertisers;

  • Take into account daypart, device type, and demeanor

  • •Don’t get in the way of what the user wants to do

  • •Use data wisely and respectfully when targeting

  • •Contribute to the value exchange and reciprocity

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Online Content Videos Exceed 50 Billion Monthly Views in December 2013

comScore, via the Video Metrix report, has stated that, for the first time ever, a single month of online video viewing has purportedly topped 50 billion video views. I say purportedly because, as we are all aware by now, it’s not really the truth based on the way that they choose to track video views. Any 3-second viewing of a video is included, multiple views are included for a single piece of content, etc. Here’s their definition once again:

A video is defined as any streamed segment of audiovisual content, including both progressive downloads and live streams. For long-form, segmented content, (e.g. television episodes with ad pods in the middle) each segment of the content is counted as a distinct video stream. Video views are inclusive of both user-initiated and auto-played videos that are viewed for longer than 3 seconds.

So while it may be 50 billion views by that metric, it’s most probably a lot, lot less in terms of what other people consider a piece of video content, for example, an episode of a television show. A single episode on Hulu is accounting for 3 or more views in the comScore Video Metrix based on the number of ad pods (n) which means (n+1) video views, so please take 50 billion views with a large grain of salt. Five ad pods in a single episode then results in six reported video views.

Facebook Overtake AOL in Battle For Top Online Video Content Property, But Both Still Miles Behind Google

The total increase over November is just over 5 billion views, with a drop in minutes per viewer of just around 13 minutes per along with a drop in total viewers of almost a million. So in a nutshell less people spent less time watching videos online in December than November, yet generated 5 billion more views at least according to comScore.

The real news in the numbers is Facebook who, remarkably, bumped AOL for second place. But there’s a reason for that because comScore notes:

Facebook’s December 2013 online video viewership, particularly the number of video views, is substantially higher than prior months due to both organic and inorganic factors. The largest (and inorganic) source of increase is the recent inclusion, following a technical validation effort, of a significant volume of short (typically 6-second) Vine videos that have been uploaded to Facebook. The other, and currently less significant, factor is the limited roll-out in December of auto-play videos in the Facebook News Feed.

Facebook minutes per viewer also went up from 28 to 50 in a single month, and in addition they added 13 million viewers and nearly tripled the amount of views. So those autoplay videos are counting as views clearly. I suppose that hypothetically, they were in the viewing window of the browser and could, again hypothetically, have been viewed by someone. But that’s a lot of hypotheticals on which to base such important numbers.Still, it’s no more shaky than their 3-second rule for video views I guess. This is all information to take into account when you use these numbers for business or for ad buying.

top us ad video content properties dec 2013

 

Video Ad Networks Explode?

It was just like a year ago when a single video ad network broke the 1 billion ads in a month mark. Now, if you’re not reaching that mark, you don’t make the top ten. Well, OK, there is still one spot in the top ten below that mark which is Videology with 991 million video ads in December 2013. At the top end of the spectrum is AOL with over 4 billion video ads in December. We should start a pool on who hits 5B first and then another for 10B video ads.

The whole video ad industry, at least those tracked by comScore, accounted for 35,235,361,000 video ads, roughly 0.67 video ads per comScore video view. That’s roughly an ad per 1.5 video views. December also saw an average frequency of 204.1 video ads per viewer for 55.6% of the US population. That boils down to a video ad every 5.7 minutes and an average ad length of 0.38 minutes or 23 seconds. Finally, video ads accounted for 40.2% of all videos viewed, which is misleading due to their determination of a video view. It’s probably more like 3:1 ads to video content files views. For example, if every video viewed and tracked by comScore was bisected with an ad pod, the total video file views fall to 26.2 billion, while video ad views remain at 35.2B. Granted, comScore also states that the average online content video is 4.2 minutes. 5.7% of all time viewing videos last month online, was watching ads.

top us video ad properties dec 2013

 

 

Top YouTube Partner Channels: VEVO Still Triumphant

Has anyone ever wondered if there’s a YouTube channel that’s not a YouTube Partner channel but is getting more than 16.3 million uniques per month? Either way, none can top VEVO most likely, what with its 38,460,000 unique viewers a month which is about 20.4% of all video viewers online and roughly 11.4% of the US population. They average 51.1 minutes each. SureMaker Studios has 72.2 minutes each for their 24.7 million uniques, but they’re a full 100 million videos behind per month. Fullscreen put up a good fight as well with 27.3M uniques, and 40.9 minutes average but showed just 358.3M videos. The one stat I would like to see in this chart is total uniques for these channels. Because as far as we can tell there are just 38.46M unique viewers for all of them which is just 20.4% of all Google/YouTube video viewers. Really, it has to be more like 50% given the wide range of topics for the top ten channels.

top youtube channels dec 2013

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Five Trends That Will Define Branded Video In 2014

Branded video reached new heights in 2013. More than 38% of new campaigns achieved more than 1 million views in 2013, compared with 26% in the year prior. And 5% of campaigns reached more than 10 million views, compared to 3% the year before.

In 2012, brands saw campaigns like Red Bull’s “Stratos,” Invisible Children’s “Kony 2012,” and Rovio’s “Angry Birds Space” become mega viral hits. The result of that success was that brands began to see producing quality content – not just ads – as an important weapon in their marketing arsenals.

So in 2013, the name of their game was perfecting the brand story. And in this regard, many brands succeeded this year. Brands were able to drive big views consistently throughout the year.

The biggest campaign of 2013, “Real Beauty Sketches,” came from video veteran Dove. This emotional campaign questions women’s self-image with the help of a trained FBI sketch artist. While the short film met with a warm reception, for the most part, some critics felt that the ad patronized women. But that debate didn’t hurt the brand; the media coverage that ensued only helped to lengthen the life of the video and drive views up to more than 136.2 million views.

Other brands that hit it big included Volvo Trucks, which emerged from obscurity with “Live Test” starring Jean Claude Van Damme. Pepsi MAX pulled off a stunt in “Gordon Test Drive,” and Internet Explorer called on our nostalgia with “Child of the ‘90s.”

So what does 2014 hold for branded video? Based on the successes of 2013, here are five trends that I think will flourish in the coming year:

  • Longer-form, cinematic content: The draw of branded video is the freedom it gives brands to tell their stories outside of the 30-second TV spot. So videos like True MoveH’s “Giving,” were longer and more cinematic.
  • Stoking the debate: Some of the biggest video stories in the 2013 came from brands that incited debate. Cheerios, for example, achieved its biggest success to date with “Just Checking,” which opened a long debate about interracial families and their portrayal in the media late last year. Did they mean to start the debate? Probably not, but it did keep their brand in headlines for weeks.
  • More interactivity: Old Spice produced one of the most viral interactive campaigns with 2010’s “Responses.” It produced another in 2012 with “Muscle Music,” which allowed viewers to create their own music inside of a video. And last year Intel and Toshiba released its third social film, “The Power Inside,” which allowed viewers to shape the campaign’s story through social media. Interactive campaigns like these only work when viewers actually engage with them. As the video universe gets more crowded, brands will be looking for unique ways to attract and engage viewers, and interactivity is a great way to do both.
  • Real-time campaigns: At last year’s Super Bowl, Oreo became the poster child for real-time marketing with its half-time tweet, while Coca Cola’s campaign changed based on the score of the game. Both brands had good feedback from their campaigns, which seemed more relevant because of how timely they were.
  • Encouraging user-generated content: Some of the most successful campaigns of the last year benefited from user-generated content. Volvo Trucks’ “Live Test” generated more than 30 million of its more than 111 million views from user-generated content – spoofs, mashups, copies, responses, etc. Besides showing how engaged viewers are with a brand’s campaign, user-generated content that takes off can extend the life of a campaign.

These trends – and the more cinematic, provocative, imaginative, and engaging campaigns that they produce – will lead to one thing: views skyrocketing higher than ever before. As we have seen every year for the past five years, overall views in 2014 will surpass 2013, as brands continue to break new ground and perfect their video storytelling and strategies. If you are looking for advice in producing effective video marketing campaign’s then please get in touch with our team atbespokevideoproduction.com.

YouTube Ads Rewind 2013 [Peek of the Year]

YouTube has given us their top moments of the year in YouTube Rewind 2013 but they’ve released another video that spotlights the most creative, effective and loved ads of the past year. These are the ads that viewers chose to watch, to share, to tweet about and to engage with. 2013 saw a sea-change in the way advertisers reached out to their audience with entertainment based content resonating in a far more effective way than product pushing. This was reflected in the fact that, for the first time, three brands made it into the top trending videos of the year. Let’s take a look at the global video ads chosen by YouTube – which one was your favorite?

The ads, in order of appearance and in full, are:

Honda – Honda “Hands”:

Oreo – Oreo Separator Machine:

Orangina – Mission 404:

Heineken – Departure Roulette:

Evian – Baby & Me:

Dove – Real Beauty Sketches:

Coca-Cola – Small World Machines – Bringing India & Pakistan Together:

Lifebuoy – Help a Child Reach 5:

Turkish Airlines – Kobe vs. Messi: The Selfie Shootout:

Guerlain – La Legende de Shalimar:

Chipotle – Scarecrow:

NBC Sports – An American Coach in London:

Pepsi – Test Drive:

Kmart – Ship My Pants:

Zoosk – #Heartfriend:

Samsung Televisions – Usher’s “Looking 4 Myself” Presented by Samsung:

LG – Ultra Reality:

PlayStation: Official PlayStation Greatness Awaits Trailer: