Peek of the Week – The Top 20 Most Shared Online Video Ads For June 2014

World Cup ads predictably dominate this month’s Unruly Global Ads Chart. With the biggest sporting event on the planet in full swing, it’s no surprise to see almost half of the top 20 video ads of the month are football-related. Just like last month, Colombian pop princess Shakira’s collaboration with yoghurt brand Activia “La La La” leads the way. Dubbed the ‘unofficial World Cup theme song’, it attracted a mammoth 2.72 million shares during June, making it not only the most shared football ad of the year, but also the sixth most shared ad of all time.

Brands unaffiliated with this year’s World Cup have certainly dominated this year’s World Cup. Despite creating half as many videos as FIFA-affiliated advertisers, commercials from non-sponsors have so far generated almost three-quarters of the shares. As with previous World Cups, Nike is one of the standout stars, so far attracting more than three times more shares than its fiercest rival adidas, who has been an official World Cup sponsor since 1970.

This month’s chart features two ads from the Oregon-based company. In second spot is “The Last Game”, an ad designed in a style familiar to Pixar films like Toy Story or The Incredibles. It depicts a world in which homogenous clone footballers have taken over the sport, leaving mavericks like Zlatan and Neymar Jr. to take other professions, such as hairdressers. It’s a little like the town that banned dancing in Footloose, only with Wayne Rooney instead of Kevin Bacon.

Seeing hugely famous athletes Disney-fied up is a strange joy, and the short film flies by with wit and imagination. With nearly 900,000 shares last month alone, it won’t be Nike’s last game either. Nike’s epic “Winner Stays” also makes June’s top 20 (18th), while adidas’ “House Match”, featuring David Beckham, is eighth.

In fourth is another ad from a brand not affiliated with the World Cup – Beats By Dre’s “Game Before The Game”. Backed up by a rousing soundtrack from Jamie N Commons & The X Ambassadors, the video features football stars and fans preparing for the match of their lives by going through their various superstitious pre-match rites. Neymar listens to a message from his dad, Cesc Fabregas kisses his ring four times, while Luis Suarez kisses the tattoo on his wrist of his children’s names. It’s an incredible watch, enough to get the pulses racing of even the most ardent football refuseniks.

Other new football-related ads to make it on to the top 20 are Banco de Chile’s compelling “Comercial Mineros” and a commercial from Middle-Eastern telecommunications company Ooredoo which stars Argentinian soccer superstar Lionel Messi. Castrol’s “Footkhana” is still the most shared ad from an official partner.

But World Cup ads did not have it all their own way during June. After scoring a huge social video hit last year with its wickedly funny “The Camp Gyno”, tampon subscription service HelloFlo returned last month with yet another fresh approach to feminine hygiene marketing. Created to promote its period starter kit, “First Moon Party” features a young girl so desperate to join her “blood sisters” at school she paints red nail varnish on a sanitary towel to fake her first period. Her mum quickly rumbles her, but plays along, organising what can only be described as the party from hell to celebrate her daughter’s milestone.

The result is probably the funniest ad about tampons ever made. Intentionally funny, at least. And judging by the ad’s immediate success, I’m not the only one giggling. The video has already surpassed the original, attracting 232,306 shares in just over a week, making it the ninth most shared ad last month. With lines like “Grandpa is bobbing for ovaries like a champ” and “do you know how hard it is to find a uterus pinata?”, the ad’s edgy humour and awkward subject matter will certainly not be to everyone’s tastes. But you certainly have to take your hat off to HelloFlo for coming up with a piece of content that would not look out of place during an episode of hit US TV show Modern Family.

Another feminine care brand also makes it on to this month’s top 20. But unlike HelloFlo’s humorous spot, P&G brand Always uses a more inspirational message to get people sharing its ad, “Like A Girl”. Directed by notable documentary photographer and filmmaker Lauren Greenfield, whose work has cataloged the self-esteem crisis among American females, the video empowers young women to turn an insulting phrase into a positive affirmation.

As one participant observes the end of the film, “why can’t ‘run like a girl’ also mean ‘win the race’?”. It’s a compelling message, which certainly resonated across the social web last month. Attracting more than 219,00 shares in just a few days, “Like A Girl” was the 11th most shared ad during June.

Other new ads to make it into the top 20 this month include a safety ad from Volkswagen that is sure to make you think twice about texting while driving and trailers for the latest chapters of the successful video game franchises FIFA, Assassin’s Creed, Mortal Kombat and Grand Theft Auto.

 

4K Is Here!

Are you ready for 4K? Manufacturers are, and they are ramping up for the next phase in how we enjoy videos, both on mobile TV and via big screens. There are some hurdles, and although it seemingly took the better part of decade for most countries to transition into 720p/1080p HDTV, the next wave of ultra resolution definitely seems like it is on the fast track.

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So just how big of a leap is going from HDTV to 4K? It’s big. Current HDTV specs come in at 1280×720/1920×1080, 16:9 ratio and 24p, 30p and 60i. 4K ramps up to a pretty big jump of 7680×4320. The same aspect ratio of 16:9 is in effect, but the frame rate is bumped up to 60p, for extremely high-definition, flicker-free imagery.

Companies are going full force with producing 4K sets, but the lack of content could be problematic. And that’s where we come in! The team at ReelDealHD is committed to providing consumers with next level products and services that add to the scarce library of 4K content.

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This week we are proud to announce that we will be contributing to the advancement of this next level technology and commencing our first 4K project. The beauty in 4K viewing is best exhibited through gorgeous patterns and hues. Because of this, it is fitting that we have chosen to bring the party to life by recreating a nightclub scene packed with dazzling lights and vibrant outfits.

Make sure to stay connected with ReelDealHD in order to get more information on 4K as well as a behind the scenes look at this weeks shoot.

Peek of the Week

Top 20 ads of February 2014

1. Budweiser: Puppy Love – 1.16 million shares

2. Learn for Life: Set Yourself Free – 540,887

3. SOS Mayday: Would You Give Your Jacket To Johannes – 456,769

4. GoPro: Red Bull Stratos – The Full Story – 401,394

5. Schwarzkopf: You – 335,099

6. Canadian Institute of Diversity and Inclusion: Luge – 310,857

7. Three: Sing It Kitty – 262,680

8. Coca-Cola: Social Media Guard – 255,026

9. Budweiser: A Hero’s Welcome – 253,431

10. EDEKA: Supergeil – 252,790

11. Sesame Street: Benedict Cumberbatch – 249,791

12. Coca-Cola: America Is Beautiful – 225,682

13. Bud Light: Ian Up For Whatever – 196,781

14. Melbourne Metro: Dumb Ways To Valentine – 174,922

15. Pepsi Max: Test Drive 2 – 156,037

16. GoPro: Lions – The New Endangered Species – 145,407

17. Vivo and Samsung:  Metamorfose Ambulante – 144,837

18. Audi: Doberhuahua – 135,520

19. Jaguar: RendezVous – 130,672

20. Kia: The Truth – 129,489

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Pre-roll Ads Most Tolerable Video Ad Format [Report]

Yahoo! surveyed 1,775 consumers in the 16-44 age range who are regular online video viewers, several time a week at the least. Some of the results seem counter-intuitive to what many other reports have found. I guess it depends on who you survey, what platform you survey form and when you survey.

Paying for video seems to be not all that popular with the Yahoo! survey respondents. Just 35% said they would make micro payments for video while just 25% would pay monthly subscription fees for video. But the question is, are they talking about things like news video clips you find on Yahoo!? I mean, presumably, the audience they surveyed was theirs and not say, Netflix users.

Now, 35% of the U.S. online video viewing population is about 66 million people so that’s not all that bad. 25% is 47.25 million and that would be a fairly large SVOD subscriber base.

The research also showed that the video viewers are pretty ad savvy. Over half (57%) expect online advertising to be “more interactive.” More interactive than what immediately sprang to my mind. Than TV or print? Surely. Than other forms of digital advertising? Well, who knows, because I can’t find the exact wording of the question.

Privacy seems to be less of an issue to these surveyed consumers;

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Nearly half of the respondents expect online advertising to be relevant to them and 55% expect to have some choice in the ads that are shown to them. So overall, about half of the respondents are ad savvy where they have some passing familiarity with interactivity, engagement, ad relevance and targeting and ad choice, presumably in pre-roll ads.

The quality expectation for online video content has come close to that from TV.

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This question seems a bit leading to me. Were they asking about appealing or disruptive or a combination of both? Take a look at this slide from a Yahoo! presentation of the results (the typo is theirs I assure you). It’s entirely possible that the “How acceptabile [sic] are each of these ads ?” was the exact question I suppose.

yahoo video ad format acceptance

Here’s that part where I said tolerable because just 22% said that pre-rolls are more acceptable, apparently in regards to the others. Second was interactive ads which had an 18% approval rating, even though in the same slide show 57% said they expect the ads to be more interactive. Sponsorships also got 18% of the vote. Tied at 15% were banner and wrapped banners and mid-rolls were least acceptable in the reported results.

For video player ads there’s a 10% difference in acceptance of mid-roll and pre-roll. I hate pre-rolls personally, especially when the ad is paired with a piece of content that is less than 200% of the ad length. In terms of relevant targeting, 42% said they would be happy to share shopping information to get more relevant ads, another 42% said they might consider it and 16% said No .

Finally a few key take aways for advertisers;

  • Take into account daypart, device type, and demeanor

  • •Don’t get in the way of what the user wants to do

  • •Use data wisely and respectfully when targeting

  • •Contribute to the value exchange and reciprocity

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Online Content Videos Exceed 50 Billion Monthly Views in December 2013

comScore, via the Video Metrix report, has stated that, for the first time ever, a single month of online video viewing has purportedly topped 50 billion video views. I say purportedly because, as we are all aware by now, it’s not really the truth based on the way that they choose to track video views. Any 3-second viewing of a video is included, multiple views are included for a single piece of content, etc. Here’s their definition once again:

A video is defined as any streamed segment of audiovisual content, including both progressive downloads and live streams. For long-form, segmented content, (e.g. television episodes with ad pods in the middle) each segment of the content is counted as a distinct video stream. Video views are inclusive of both user-initiated and auto-played videos that are viewed for longer than 3 seconds.

So while it may be 50 billion views by that metric, it’s most probably a lot, lot less in terms of what other people consider a piece of video content, for example, an episode of a television show. A single episode on Hulu is accounting for 3 or more views in the comScore Video Metrix based on the number of ad pods (n) which means (n+1) video views, so please take 50 billion views with a large grain of salt. Five ad pods in a single episode then results in six reported video views.

Facebook Overtake AOL in Battle For Top Online Video Content Property, But Both Still Miles Behind Google

The total increase over November is just over 5 billion views, with a drop in minutes per viewer of just around 13 minutes per along with a drop in total viewers of almost a million. So in a nutshell less people spent less time watching videos online in December than November, yet generated 5 billion more views at least according to comScore.

The real news in the numbers is Facebook who, remarkably, bumped AOL for second place. But there’s a reason for that because comScore notes:

Facebook’s December 2013 online video viewership, particularly the number of video views, is substantially higher than prior months due to both organic and inorganic factors. The largest (and inorganic) source of increase is the recent inclusion, following a technical validation effort, of a significant volume of short (typically 6-second) Vine videos that have been uploaded to Facebook. The other, and currently less significant, factor is the limited roll-out in December of auto-play videos in the Facebook News Feed.

Facebook minutes per viewer also went up from 28 to 50 in a single month, and in addition they added 13 million viewers and nearly tripled the amount of views. So those autoplay videos are counting as views clearly. I suppose that hypothetically, they were in the viewing window of the browser and could, again hypothetically, have been viewed by someone. But that’s a lot of hypotheticals on which to base such important numbers.Still, it’s no more shaky than their 3-second rule for video views I guess. This is all information to take into account when you use these numbers for business or for ad buying.

top us ad video content properties dec 2013

 

Video Ad Networks Explode?

It was just like a year ago when a single video ad network broke the 1 billion ads in a month mark. Now, if you’re not reaching that mark, you don’t make the top ten. Well, OK, there is still one spot in the top ten below that mark which is Videology with 991 million video ads in December 2013. At the top end of the spectrum is AOL with over 4 billion video ads in December. We should start a pool on who hits 5B first and then another for 10B video ads.

The whole video ad industry, at least those tracked by comScore, accounted for 35,235,361,000 video ads, roughly 0.67 video ads per comScore video view. That’s roughly an ad per 1.5 video views. December also saw an average frequency of 204.1 video ads per viewer for 55.6% of the US population. That boils down to a video ad every 5.7 minutes and an average ad length of 0.38 minutes or 23 seconds. Finally, video ads accounted for 40.2% of all videos viewed, which is misleading due to their determination of a video view. It’s probably more like 3:1 ads to video content files views. For example, if every video viewed and tracked by comScore was bisected with an ad pod, the total video file views fall to 26.2 billion, while video ad views remain at 35.2B. Granted, comScore also states that the average online content video is 4.2 minutes. 5.7% of all time viewing videos last month online, was watching ads.

top us video ad properties dec 2013

 

 

Top YouTube Partner Channels: VEVO Still Triumphant

Has anyone ever wondered if there’s a YouTube channel that’s not a YouTube Partner channel but is getting more than 16.3 million uniques per month? Either way, none can top VEVO most likely, what with its 38,460,000 unique viewers a month which is about 20.4% of all video viewers online and roughly 11.4% of the US population. They average 51.1 minutes each. SureMaker Studios has 72.2 minutes each for their 24.7 million uniques, but they’re a full 100 million videos behind per month. Fullscreen put up a good fight as well with 27.3M uniques, and 40.9 minutes average but showed just 358.3M videos. The one stat I would like to see in this chart is total uniques for these channels. Because as far as we can tell there are just 38.46M unique viewers for all of them which is just 20.4% of all Google/YouTube video viewers. Really, it has to be more like 50% given the wide range of topics for the top ten channels.

top youtube channels dec 2013

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YouTube advertising revenue surges 50% to $5.6bn

Advertisers will spend a projected $5.6bn on YouTube in 2013, an increase of more than 50 per cent on the previous year, according to a report that underlines a shift away from traditional television ads. The sharp rise, which follows an explosion of viewing on mobile devices, comes as advertisers strive to reach younger consumers who have drifted away from television. Television’s share of advertising budgets has peaked after 30 years of growth and online video is now competing for ad spending. YouTube does not keep all of the advertising revenue that flows through its site, paying much of it to partners and “content creators”. The report, by media research firm eMarketer, predicts that YouTube’s net revenues will be $1.96bn once those partners have been paid, giving it 1.7 per cent of all global digital advertising spending. This is a larger market share than sites such as Twitter, AOL and Pandora, eMarketer said.

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“Video ad revenues are expected to increase significantly in coming years for YouTube’s US operations, particularly as mobile video viewership grows,” said the report. Television remains the biggest global recipient of ad spending globally: in the US advertisers are expected to spend an estimated $66.5bn in 2013. But eMarketer is projecting only modest increases over the next three years. “There’s ongoing fragmentation in viewing,” said Dan Cryan, senior director of digital media with IHS, a media research firm. “TV viewing is more or less flat but total video viewing is going up and that’s being driven by things like YouTube and Netflix.”

YouTube, acquired by Google in 2006 for $1.65bn, has more than 1bn viewers every month and attracts about a fifth of all advertising spending on US online video. It has faced competition from rival sites such as Hulu, which expects to generate $1bn in advertising revenues in 2013, but it has maintained its lead. Hulu, owned by Walt Disney, 21st century Fox and NBCUniversal, has twice explored a sale only to call off proposed deals at the last minute.

Heightened advertiser interest in YouTube comes as a new generation of online video production studios have sprung up to cater for a younger generation that watches most of its television programming online.

Investors are clamouring to get a foothold in these companies: Maker Studios, one of the biggest online video networks, recently brought in investors to join a shareholder list that includes Time Warner, Elisabeth Murdoch and Robert Downey Jr, the film star.

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Where Branded Content Dollars Are Going; Publishing companies gain share, ad agencies shrink [Survey]

Marketers continue to be in love with their own content. Spending on branded content is set to reach $1.8 million this year, or 37 percent of marketers’ ad budgets, up from $1.7 million in 2012, per a Custom Content Council survey.

The lion’s share of that is going into print. Spending on publications rose the most of three measured categories in 2013, to just over $1 million from $775,000 in 2012. Spending on electronic content was up 13.8 percent to $574,490 and spending on other content shrank to $264,423.

That would seem to bode ill for magazines. Seventy-three percent of respondents said branded content is better than magazine ads, a sizable increase over 2012, when 66 percent said so. Sixty-three percent said branded content was superior to TV advertising, 62 percent favored branded content to direct mail, and 59 percent said it trumps public relations.

One big question for marketers is whether to outsource their content creation or generate it in-house. Forty percent of respondents said they’re doing some outsourcing, down from 56 percent in 2012. But those who are only outsourcing are doing bigger projects, spending an average of more than $1 million this year, up 5.5 percent.

Those marketers are increasingly bypassing traditional ad agencies for other types of firms to handle their content creation. Magazine publishers who may be losing ad dollars to branded content seem to be making it up on the custom content side. The biggest recipient of outsourcing is publishing firms, which got 36 percent of that spending, up from 32 percent last year. Design firms and ad agencies saw their shares shrink. PR/marketing firms’ share rose slightly, and interactive firms’ share was flat.