Corporate videos put employees in the frame

Many people use YouTube and Facebook to achieve “15 minutes of fame” in their personal lives by making videos about their interests and enthusiasms. Now employers are encouraging them to do the same at work.

Reality TV has been a big influence, and everyone wants to be on camera now, says Vern Hanzlik, executive vice-president of Qumu, a video management software company. “Video is becoming a much more mainstream method of internal communications for companies, from the chief executive to junior employees,” he adds.

This was borne out in an international survey of 300 companies in February and March this year by Kaltura, another video management software company. Some 70 per cent of respondents said they regard video as essential for internal communication, knowledge sharing and collaboration.

More than three-quarters agreed that video provides a “nearly in-person” experience, making messages powerful in a way that written communication cannot and helping connect geographically divided employees.

The problem is video’s voracious appetite for bandwidth and storage space. “Video clogs up corporate networks, so you need the infrastructure for intelligent routing and streaming,” says Mr Hanzlik. This is the aim of products such as Qumu and Kaltura.

Bayer piloted Qumu last year when it held a singing contest to celebrate its 150th anniversary. It invited employees to upload videos of their performances to its corporate network, assess each other’s rendering of the specially commissioned song, share their favourites and vote for winners.

The contest was a huge success, attracting 200 entries and 680,000 viewings, says Thomas Helfrich, Bayer’s global head of social media. “It was unbelievable to see how excited contestants were, and the venues and styles they came up with,” he says.

“There were entries from more than 50 countries, including China, Mexico, Machu Picchu and the oldest stadium in Uruguay.” But they comprised 100 terabytes of data and there was no way Bayer’s existing network would have been able to cope.

Qumu handled the task so smoothly that Bayer has since adopted it for all its videos. Philips had similar success with Kaltura last November, when it asked employees to make videos of what the company’s brand meant to them.

The aim was to build staff awareness of Philips’ three businesses – healthcare, consumer/lifestyle and lighting. Again there was an enthusiastic response, says Paul Osgood, Philips’ head of internal communications.

A Philips employee in Brazil filmed himself cycling through São Paulo, contrasting a dingy and deserted neighbourhood, which felt dangerous, with a brightly-lit street where people were partying on the pavement. A female employee in the US made a video demonstrating how different her headphones made her life while jogging.

“People loved watching the videos and they went viral,” Mr Osgood says, but without Kaltura this could have brought down the Philips network. The software also lets Philips integrate the videos with its in-house TV channel, so that they can be viewed on TV screens by people working in factories where they do not have PCs.

Video management software makes the approvals process much more efficient, says Bayer’s Mr Helfrich. Many Bayer videos have to be checked for compliance and intellectual property issues such as copyright, patents and trademarks.

The software also provides better security than ad hoc systems built in-house. This was important at Bayer, where videos need to be stored securely for legal reasons and to ensure data privacy. “We wanted an application we could run in a protected environment with access restricted to employees,” Mr Helfrich says.

Ease of use is crucial for such software to be adopted widely across an organisation. The simplicity of Qumu meant that some 25,000 people had largely taught themselves how to use it by the end of the contest.

“We invested nothing in training beyond making a short online tutorial,” Mr Helfrich says. “It involved far less effort and education than usual when introducing new software.”

The next big step with corporate video, says Mr Osgood, will be giving staff access to it on their mobile phones. In the Kaltura survey, 75 per cent of respondents said that the ability easily to include video in corporate emails, social media and instant messaging would play an important role in the near future.

Employers are becoming much more receptive to the idea of their staff making and sharing videos, says Michal Tsur, Kaltura’s president and co-founder. “Three years ago, managers worried that employees might say the wrong thing, so their focus was on moderating, patrolling and reporting tools,” Mr Tsur says.

“But there has been a change in culture towards empowering employees. Organisations are recognising that communication need not be just top down, but can be bottom up, and that employees may have information that chief executives do not.”

Organisations have also realised that videos can help identify talent, spot charismatic employees and get more information from and about them, Mr Tsur says.

All this may be good for employees wanting to raise their profile at work. But as with other online activities, they would do well to check what they might subsequently be able to remove, should circumstances alter. Otherwise people may find their “fame” lasting longer than they bargained for.

Reeldeahd and nowhouse created OfficeBlink a unique corporate video format.  We successfully produced a series of video insights in these companies that was used for recruitment and social media. Would you like to learn more about how corporate video can help your company then please contact sales@reeldealhd.com

 

How Virgin America Got 6 Million People To Watch A Flight Safety Video Without Stepping On A Plane

When was the last time you paid attention to a pre-flight safety demonstration? In the past 12 days, Virgin America has managed to get 5.8 million people to watch their safety video without even stepping on a plane!

Virgin America Safety Video

The airline roped in American director Jon M.Chu (Step Up 2, Step Up 3D) and a team of renowned choreographers, producers and dance stars to give their safety video a full blown makeover. 36 dancersspent 26 hours on set, using 14 different dance styles including broadway, contemporary, jazz, tango, b-boy and break dancing. The end result is this innovative piece of entertainment that has received over 5.8 million YouTube views, 430,000 Facebook shares and 17,000 tweets in less than 2 weeks!

Check out the full video below:

Behind the scenes:

The cast consisted of 10 So You Think You Can Dance alum, 2 former Olympians and 1 American Idol finalist. Watch this behind-the-scenes video to know more about the VX Safety Dance concept, the crew and the creative minds behind the campaign:

You can submit your dance moves at VXsafetydance.com and be part of Virgin America’s next safety video. What ‘s your take on this new approach to in-flight safety demonstrations? Ingenious or ineffective? Would you find this entertaining if you’re a frequent flyer? Share your views in the comments section below.

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“East meets West” – ReeldealHD launches HD stock footage aimed at the growing Asian market

There are currently more TV sets in China than there are people in the USA, and potential locked in to its vast 1.4 bn consumer base.

The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of the People;s Repubic of china states that there were 1.1. billion mobile phone users in the country according to the released figures in December 2012 it also revealed that China boast well over half a billion internet users, that’s the worlds largest online populations. Of those netizens an impressive 91 percent are busy connecting on social media sites.

Focused on this emerging market we launch our royalty free stock video collection “East meets West”  with 223 brand new HD clips.

Start creating your story with this brand new HD video covering the following topics;

BEAUTY

EAST MEETS WEST BUSINESS

TOURIST COUPLE

COUPLE AT HOME

More Asian video content to follow, if you have any enquiries regarding licensing this content, want to become a ReeldealHD distributor or would like a bespoke video prodcution feel free to contact us 

7 Essential Video Settings to Check Before Shooting your video:

When every day shooting new content its important not to loose track on the important essentials things.
Thats’ why we create a list of things to check before you hit the record button on your camera.

1.) Resolution & Frame Rate: This is vitally important when shooting with multiple cameras each camera needs to have the exact same resolution and frame rate.  Making footage settings match each other will make it so much easier to edit.

2.) White Balance: Important to make sure color temperatures look natural.  This is crucial to remember when going inside then outside (or vice versa) because color temperature of light is different outdoors than indoors. Make the time to adjust your white balance properly with every set-up.

3.) Gain or ISO: Your Gain and ISO settings make sure your image is properly exposed. Higher ISO settings are for low light and lower ISO settings are for bright lights.  Higher ISO settings also equals more camera noise and lower ISO settings makes a cleaner image.

4.) Scene Profile (Picture Profile) Mode: The correct picture style can make or break your image.control over the image in post.  Looking for more control over the contrast and saturation to your image? Use a neutral setting. Looking to do less work in post? Try using a standard setting.

5.) Shutter Speed: A great rule of thumb is to double the frame rate you are shooting and that will be your shutter speed.  A good setting for 24p footage is 1/50th, a good setting for 60p footage is 125th, and so on.

6.) Aperture or F-Stop Settings: Knowing what F-Stop settings to go with really depends on the type of lens you are using. Knowing your lens’s maximum aperture will help you choose the best f-stop setting for the situation. A general rule of thumb is a lens will generate the sharpest image towards the middle of the glass..  So a setting like f5.6 may be good.  But to create moreshallow depth of field f2.8 or lower may be better

7.) Focus: Nothing is worse than having great exposure settings only to pull up your footage and find a crucial shot was out of focus so use the focus assist in your camera.

If you would like more FREE advise on shooting your next video get in touch !  Looking for content to use in your next video? Make sure you check ReeldealHD or Greenscreenfilms.com and choose from over 5000 HD premium RF stock footage clips perfect for your next project.

Walmart Turn To Online Video with “get on the shelf” original series

Walmart, the world’s largest retailer and biggest private employer, has launched its first ever web series aimed at giving the American public the opportunity to decide which new products get to go on the their shelves, both on and offline. Wrapped up in a reality series format, the first episode features products from four U.S. entrepreneurs, picked from thousands of entrants to a crowd sourcing product contest. The four showcase their merchandise and the one that proves the most popular with the audience wins the chance to see the retail giant stock and sell it. There are five weekly shows in the series, the first one is launched today with the others following suit on a weekly basis through to October 22nd. Products included on the first show include a line of gourmet scented stuffed animals and a brilliant wheelchair for infirm or injured dogs. You can see the full list of finalists and their wareshere (Elvis Presley Bedding Collection anyone?)

Viewers can visit the Get On The Shelf site and vote online for their favourite product/entrepreneur each week. The series is produced by the digital studio team behind Shark Tank’s Mark Burnett so the format is a pretty tried and tested one. To drive further engagement, viewers are given just 72 hours after each episode goes live to vote. The winner, based on the amount of pre-orders gained, will receive additional marketing support from Walmart. You can see the first show here (at time of writing it’s still shown as unlisted on YouTube):

Kelly Thompson, Senior VP of Merchandising for Walmart.com is excited for the project and confirms that:

Get on the Shelf celebrates the resilient and tenacious spirit of American entrepreneurs, many of whom have been working hard for a big break like this. The web series creates more exposure for finalists to share their inspiring stories, which makes for captivating reality TV that’s also interactive since American consumers can vote for the next great product at Walmart.com.

Will Video Ads Sink Facebook? Social Media Giant Faces User Backlash

The video ad market is on the cusp of a multi-billion dollar expansion that could transform Facebook and Instagram into syndication platforms putting pressure on the existing TV model, but those users may not accept commercials as readily as major online video sites.

TV advertising is a big business, but online video ads are projected to grow even more rapidly. eMarketer says that advertisers in the U.S. will spend $66.4 billion on TV ads this year, compared to $4.1 billion online. However, it foresees 40 percent growth in video ads.

Facebook Has the Potential To Generate $1 Billion in Ad Revenue

Morgan Stanley financial analysts are predicting that Facebook could generate over $1 billion next year in video ad revenues and as much as $6.5 billion by 2020. Advertisers are willing to pay a premium to Facebook because its ability to reach the coveted 25-34 demographic can exceed TV networks’ reach, Nielsen has found.

Facebook is especially attractive to advertisers during primetime hours. Nielsen has found that it is “a strong driver of duplicated reach—meaning that a marketer could reach the same consumers online and on TV.” Facebook complements TV ads and is overturning the perception that the Internet is only for niche audiences by becoming a channel for “broadly messaged, brand advertising,” Nielsen said in a July report. What’s important to note is that Facebook has served as extension to the main TV experience by bringing value through second screen activities. The Nielsen report noted that: The emergence of far-reaching publishers like Facebook, however, means that marketers now have another option for reaching consumers en masse. Likewise, the availability of true cross-screen metrics enables them to understand how digital can reinforce and complement their TV investment.

Facebook User Attention Span Is An Issue

Facebook has the scale to do this with its 1.15 billion monthly active users, but actual consumer interactions with its video ads could deviate from what analysts are expecting. Consumers are willing to sit through 30 or 60-second advertisements on online video platforms like YouTube,Hulu and UVidi, because they want access to the content. The social consumer is different – they don’t have the same attention span.

Moreover, Facebook doesn’t have a content strategy to hold users’ attention. The majority of the content that it distributes is user-generated and short-form, thus greatly reducing the likelihood that anyone is going to want to sit through a commercial to watch their friend’s cat fall off a couch. As video consumption evolves, we are seeing that 15 and 30 second pre-rolls are effective when users want premium content. It’s likely you will see much shorter messaging on social platforms with pre-roll that is 5 to 8 seconds long. Early testers will try to create branded content and use Facebook as a distribution source, but currently it can’t compete with the big video platforms because it won’t deliver equivalent results with its existing videos.

That’s the challenge: Facebook offers a very different customer experience from other content distribution sites. A model that could work would be to complement a TV advertising package with a Facebook extension that includes video to target mobile devices. More than 40 percent of Facebook’s advertising revenue and 68 percent of its traffic come from mobile customers, according to its Q2 earnings call in late July. That’s assuming users want ads.

Consumer sentiment could be why Facebook is moving so cautiously with video ads. It wants its ads to display in ways that aren’t distracting or alienating towards users the Wall Street Journal reports. “Striking that balance between consumer happiness and commercial opportunity has been a challenge for the young company, leading to delays and frustrations among the marketers it is trying to woo,” the report said.

While Facebook tinkers, established video platforms are better positioned to drawn display budget because of the duration of the videos. Morgan Stanley predicts that YouTube will generate $5.7 billion in video ad revenue next year, which is estimated to grow to approximately $17 billion by 2019.

Facebook could meet the street’s expectations, but that’s only true if consumers buy in. Content is king and will influence consumer interactions with video advertisements.

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

Pixability just released a study called, “The Top 100 Global Brands: Key Lessons for Success on YouTube,” which showed how these companies (based on Interbrands’ top 100) have been using the platform.  From these findings, Pixability was able to derive some lessons that all marketers can use.  And they studied everything: what are brands doing with multiple channels, how they used social media, were they properly targeting the ads, did they post consistently, do some brands have channels that are basically dormant, and so on. What are the best brands doing on YouTube?  Read on.

Top 100 Brands & YouTube: Key Takeaways

Here’s something that has probably been said on this site more than any other thing:

1. Post content consistently.

The most successful brands publish 50 percent more videos per channel than the least successful ones.  They do it on a regular schedule.

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

2. Take YouTube SEO seriously.

Citing its place as the 2nd-largest search engine in the world, behind only its parent company Google, Pixability says discoverability is key.  YouTube SEO is very different from traditional SEO, and Google favors web pages with YouTube embeds.  The best 25 percent of brands optimize their videos properly, utilizing more playlists and tags than the bottom 25 percent.

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

3. No need for overproduction.

The best brands produce a variety of content.

4. Always On

The top brands integrate their video strategy with their offline strategy.  17 of the top 100 brands use less than 50 percent of their channels.  Brands should not be afraid to create web series for limited, but highly engaged audiences.

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

5. Put your brand on everything where it makes sense.

The top brands put the logo in the video and in the metadata.  Why is putting it in the video important?  Because people aren’t always watching your content on your channel.  The regular watch page on YouTube and any embed isn’t likely to have your branding anywhere, so use it where you can.  But don’t go overboard and start sticking it in so many places that you create brand fatigue.

6. Content is more important than Channels.

Uploading consistent content is way more important than creating multiple specialized channels.  37 percent of all channels were not updated with new content in 120 days.  The best channels focus on their target audience and deliver video to them regularly.  The study cites Kleenex, Johnny Walker, and Yahoo (although with Yahoo’s focus on their own video, that makes sense) as the worst offenders with 80 percent of their channels remaining inactive for more than 120 days.

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

7. Use that social media thing.

The top 25 percent of brands used social media way more effectively than the bottom 25.  Pixability also found that across different industries, home and luxury segments have the highest sentiment, while financial services and consumer goods are the lowest.  The top brands had 89 times more Tweets and 330 times more Facebook activity:

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

Points on Video Marketing

  • Pixability found that brands focus entirely too much on video production and not enough on video marketing. Over 50 percent of the entire library of videos produced by the top brands have less than 1,000 views.
  • Of the 100 brands, only 1 (Morgan Stanley) doesn’t have a YouTube channel.
  • 56 of those brands have 10 channels or more.
  • Since YouTube’s launch, these brands have produced: 258,000 videos and over 1,378 channels with 9.5+ billion views total.
  • Publishing has increased an average of 73 percent annually since 2009.

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

Here are the most active industries on YouTube:

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

The top video producers also tend to get the most views (Thomson Reuters could use some help), publishing 78 videos per month.  Media companies are publishing 500 a month:

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

Pixability also espoused one of video’s top advantages: long tail.  The first three weeks of a video’s launch will account for 40 percent of the total views, but 30 percent will take place over 4-12 weeks and 30 percent will take place in the 12-52 week time period.

How the Top 100 Brands Use YouTube for Marketing

You can read the full report, “The Top 100 Global Brands: Key Lessons for Success on YouTube,” here.

We’d like to thank Pixability for providing us the data!  They also provided a supporting 1-hour webinar on YouTube, if you’re so inclined: